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Conclusion. Applicants assert that, for the reasons summarized above, the requested exemptions are appropriate in the public interest and consistent with the protection of investors and the purposes fairly intended by the policy and provisions of the 1940 Act. 37 For the Commission, by the Division of Investment Management, pursuant to delegated authority. Templeton Variable Products Series Fund, et al. File No. 812-11698 SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Release No. IC-24079 1999 SEC LEXIS 2177 October 13, 1999 ACTION: Order Granting Exemptions TEXT: Templeton Variable Products Series Fund ("Templeton Trust"), Franklin Templeton Variable Insurance Products Trust ("VIP Trust"), Templeton Funds Annuity Company ("TFAC") or any successor to TFAC, and any future open-end investment company for which TFAC or any affiliate is the administrator, sub-administrator, investment manager, adviser, principal underwriter, or sponsor ("Future Funds") filed an application on July 14, 1999, and an amendment on September 17, 1999 seeking an amended order of the Commission pursuant to Section 6(c) of the Investment Company Act of 1940 ("1940 Act") exempting them from the provisions of Sections 9(a), 13(a), 15(a) and 15(b) of the 1940 Act and Rules 6e-2(b)(15) and 6e-3(T)(b)(15). The prior order (Rel. No. IC-19879) granted exemptive relief to permit shares of the Templeton Trust to be sold to and held by variable annuity and variable life insurance separate accounts of both affiliated and unaffiliated life insurance companies. The proposed relief would amend the prior order to add as parties to that order the VIP Trust and any Future Funds and to permit shares of the Templeton Trust, the VIP Trust, and Future Funds to be issued to and held by qualified pension and retirement plans outside the separate account context. A notice of the filing of the application was issued on September 17, 1999 (Rel. No. IC-24018). The notice gave interested persons an opportunity to request a hearing and stated that an order granting the application would be issued unless a hearing should be ordered. No request for a hearing has been filed, and the Commission has not ordered a hearing. The matter has been considered, and it is found that granting the requested exemptions is appropriate in the public interest and consistent with the protection of investors and the purposes intended by the policy and provisions of the 1940 Act. Accordingly, IT IS ORDERED, pursuant to Section 6(c) of the 1940 Act, that the r...
Conclusion. We offer these concluding thoughts, against the backdrop of the dissent. Courts are, of course, well suited to adjudicate civil and criminal cases and extrapolate legislative intent (dissent at 19). They are, however, also well suited to interpret and safeguard constitutional rights and review challenged acts of our co-equal branches of government -- not in order to make policy 10 In issuing our directive to the State we recognize that it has fiscal governance over the entire State and that in a budgetary matter the Legislature must consider that any action it takes will directly or indirectly affect its other commitments. but in order to assure the protection of constitutional rights. That is what we have been called upon to do by litigants seeking to enforce the State Constitution's Education Article. The task began with Levittown's articulation of the constitutional right to a sound basic education -- not at all a "catch-phrase for an inferred constitutional guarantee" (dissent at 3), but this Court's careful judgment 21 years ago as to what is meant by our State Constitution's promise in the Education Article. CFE built on our definition of the constitutional requirement, adding to the law a determination that the complaint stated a cause of action, and that -- if plaintiffs proved their assertions, as they have -- they would establish a violation. Nor is the Court's standard of a sound basic education, articulated both in Levittown and CFE, "illusory" for failing to fix the moment when a meaningful high school education is achieved (dissent at 2-12). As the dissent itself exemplifies by "of course" rejecting the eighth (or ninth) grade test of the Appellate Division and offering no other, a constitutional standard of sound basic education need not pinpoint a date with statutory precision, so long as it defines the contours of the requirement, against which the facts of a case may then be measured.11 Indeed, a sound basic education back in 1894, when 11 In fact the dissent, though it would affirm the Appellate Division order, identifies no holding of that court that it considers the better rule of law than those we have set forth today. the Education Article was added, may well have consisted of an eighth or ninth grade education, which we unanimously reject. The definition of a sound basic education must serve the future as well as the case now before us. Finally, the remedy is hardly extraordinary or unprecedented (dissent at 18). It is, rather, an e...
Conclusion. This chapter has, first, attempted to show how the development of women‐only public spaces is tied to the historical development of the third Saudi state. It has also demonstrated that the concepts of segregation and ikhtilat are ambiguous notions that are contested by various players, including women themselves. Saudi women, it was shown, negotiate their daily realities with regard to segregation and ikhtilat while (re)producing or contesting women‐only public spaces. Their strategies when dealing with segregation and ikhtilat vary from wanting to keep the status quo, wishing to strengthen segregation, strengthening segregation as an intermediary phase towards more ikhtilat, or attempting to undermine segregation. Tamkin al­mar’a consists of participation in public life, education, and economic empowerment. This can be achieved through either ikhtilat or women‐only public spaces. The concept of nuhud al­mar’a centres around the idea of wa‘i, or raising consciousness, as well as being the period in which Saudi women perceive themselves at the moment, a period of increasing participation by women in the public sphere—either through ikhtilat or through women‐only public spaces. Women are often considered to be ‘culture bearers’, and as such the women’s issue is an area in which notions of progress and modernity are negotiated. Women themselves, too, are actively engaged in giving meaning to modernity. Their perceptions of modernity do not consist only of material progress (the internet, television, mobile phones and infrastructure) but also have a spiritual side. Most of the women interviewed identify Saudi Arabia as a modern country, and only a few made the distinction between material and cultural/intellectual modernity. Almost all of the interviewees were able to articulate what it means to be a modern Saudi woman: a woman whose fundamental characteristics are that she is educated, cultured and religious. Religiosity seems to be a fundamental part of, and for some women is even conditional to, what it means to be a modern Saudi woman. It is the duality of material progress and religiousness that seems to constitute ‘the Saudi modern’, of which tamkin al­mar’a and nuhud al­mar’a are—according to many Saudi women—essential components.
Conclusion. The neo-colonial mode of resource exploitation in Kashmir is facilitated by the comprador bureaucratic states of India and Pakistan. With help of treaty like „Indus Water Treaty‟ of 1960 the self-determinist right of the Kashmiris over the Indus water is snatched and the states of Pakistan, World Bank and India prioritizes the needs and make provisions for the supply of hydro power to the region (Shamsirfan, Indus Water Treaty puts J&K in diadvantageous position: CM 2014). Korbel placed the Kashmir question in the different character of Indian and Pakistani state, he suggested a shift from the territorial and strategical advantage (R. W. Bradnock 2007). He said, “the real cause of all bitterness and bloodshed that characterized the Kashmir dispute is the uncompromising and perhaps uncompromisable struggle of two way of life, two concept of political organization, two spiritual attitudes, that finds themselves locked in deadly conflict, a conflict which in Kashmir has become symbol and battleground” (R. W. Bradnock 2007). He further quotes Nehru who said, “it is not Kashmir therefore but the rather a much deeper conflicts that comes in way to friendly relation between India and Pakistan…we can‟t give up the basic idea which we have held for so long and on which the whole conception of our society is founded” (Nehru 1951). The idea of Nehru to project India as a secular state from its very beginning is far from the reality, the truth remains that Indian society since its very beginning has been quite violent and discriminative on the basis of class, caste and gender (Ambedkar n.d.). Nehru himself went to Benares to seek blessing through yagnas from the Brahmins before he assumed the office of prime minister while the president of India washes the feet of Brahmins at Benares to mark the coronation of a Brahmin at the highest post of the state (Anand and Iyer 2016). This proves that the idea of secularism has been used as a veil to cover the Indian state domination in the geo-political fringes. This idea has to be used so as to legitimize the control over the resources of Kashmir and the north eastern nationalities. The idea of secularism has been used as a guard against the Pakistanis claim over Kashmir. References [1]. Abid, Qalb, and Massarrat Abid. n.d. "Boundary Commission Tilting in the favour of 'Other Factor'." Pakistan Vision. [2]. Agnew, John A, and Mathew Coleman. 2012. "The Problem With Empire." [3]. Ahmad, Mustafa Nazir. 2017. India benifited more...
Conclusion. On the basis of the facts, estimates and circumstances set forth in this Tax Agreement, the City does not expect that the Certificate proceeds will be used in a manner that would cause the Lease or any Certificate to be an “arbitrage bond” within the meaning of Code § 148 and the Regulations.
Conclusion. Prüm – a substantive step forward? The Treaty of Prüm is an anachronistic attempt to revive the Schengen experience. When the first Schengen agreement was signed in 1985 – before the Single European Act, be- fore Maastricht, Amsterdam and Nice – the European Communities were still far from being able to agree upon the concept of an area of freedom, security and justice. Undis- putedly, the Schengen agreements turned eventually to pave the way to the current level of integration, however painfully. Justice and home affairs have in the meantime under- gone a remarkable shift towards Europeanisation and integration. With the extension of EU competence both in the First and Third Pillars to all the activities covered by the Prüm Treaty, there is no excuse, as was in the Schengen period, for a lack of EU compe- tence to move forward in this field. European institutions – and the European Parlia- ment in particular – have gained a central role in this field. Prüm’s return to the inter- governmental arena bluntly ignores the EU’s post-Amsterdam Treaty constitution and appears as an unfriendly and disloyal act not only towards fellow member states, but even more towards Europe. Right in the middle between Schengen and Prüm lies another little town, the town of Echternach. You have to pass it on your way from Schengen to Prüm. For centuries now, a famous procession has been held there every year. Accompanied by a simple melody, this procession is danced as follows: three paces forward and two paces back. All indica- tions suggest that Prüm signatory governments missed the opportunity to pay Echter- nach a visit on their imaginary road from Schengen to Prüm. Had they stopped, perhaps they would have realised that not every step taken is a substantive step forward.
Conclusion. We hope you find this FAQ useful to your understanding of the Relationship Disclosure Form. Please be informed that if the event of a conflict or inconsistency between this FAQ and the requirements of the applicable ordinance or law governing relationship disclosures, the ordinance or law controls. Also, please be informed that the County Attorney’s Office is not permitted to render legal advice to an applicant or any other outside party. Accordingly, if the applicant or an outside party has any questions after reading this FAQ, he/she is encouraged to contact his/her own legal counsel. ORANGE COUNTY SPECIFIC PROJECT EXPENDITURE REPORT This lobbying expenditure form shall be completed in full and filed with all application submittals. This form shall remain cumulative and shall be filed with the department processing your application. Forms signed by a principal’s authorized agent shall include an executed Agent Authorization Form. This is the initial Form: This is a Subsequent Form: Part I Please complete all of the following: Name and Address of Principal (legal name of entity or owner per Orange County tax rolls): Name and Address of Principal’s Authorized Agent, if applicable: List the name and address of all lobbyists, Contractors, contractors, subcontractors, individuals or business entities who will assist with obtaining approval for this project. (Additional forms may be used as necessary.) 1. Name and address of individual or business entity: Are they registered Lobbyist? Yes or No 2. Name and address of individual or business entity: Are they registered Lobbyist? Yes or No 3. Name and address of individual or business entity: Are they registered Lobbyist? Yes or No 4. Name and address of individual or business entity: Are they registered Lobbyist? Yes or No 5. Name and address of individual or business entity: Are they registered Lobbyist? Yes or No 6. Name and address of individual or business entity: Are they registered Lobbyist? Yes or No 7. Name and address of individual or business entity: Are they registered Lobbyist? Yes or No 8. Name and address of individual or business entity: Are they registered Lobbyist? Yes or No Part II Expenditures: For this report, an "expenditure" means money or anything of value given by the principal and/or his/her lobbyist for the purpose of lobbying, as defined in section 2-351, Orange County Code. This may include public relations expenditures including, but not limited to, petitions, fliers, purchase of med...
Conclusion. We have illustrated the benefits of distributed, consensus based platoon management over conventional centralized and leader-based platoons and presented CUBA, a new consensus protocol for platoon management, which addresses the chal- lenges of consensus in Cyber-Physical Systems. CUBA focuses on failure detection and failing vehicle identification and guar- antees to terminate in a fixed time window. For typical platoon sizes up to 20 vehicles, the communication overhead of CUBA is low compared to leader-based systems and significantly less than related consensus approaches for platoons. References [1] D. Jia, K. Lu, J. Wang, X. Zhang, and X. Shen, “A survey on platoon- based vehicular cyber-physical systems,” IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 263–284, 2016.‌ [2] M. Amoozadeh, H. Deng, C.-N. Chuah, H. M. Zhang, and D. Ghosal, “Platoon management with cooperative adaptive cruise control enabled by VANET,” Vehicular Communications, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 110–123, 4 2015. [3] Y. Zheng, S. E. Li, J. Wang, D. Cao, and K. Li, “Stability and scalability of homogeneous vehicular platoon: Study on the influence of information flow topologies,” IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 14–26, 2016. [4] S. Rowan, M. Clear, M. Gerla, M. Huggard, and C. M. Goldrick, “Securing vehicle to vehicle communications using blockchain through visible light and acoustic side-channels,” arXiv, vol. abs/1704.02553, 2017. [5] J. Sousa and A. Bessani, “From Byzantine Consensus to BFT State Machine Replication: A Latency-Optimal Transformation,” in 2012 Ninth European Dependable Computing Conference, May 2012, pp. 37–48. [6] A. Clement, E. Wong, L. Alvisi, M. Dahlin, and M. Marchetti, “Making byzantine fault tolerant systems tolerate byzantine faults,” in Proceedings of the 6th USENIX Symposium on Networked Systems Design and Implemen- tation. Berkeley, CA, USA: USENIX Association, 2009, pp. 153–168. [7] S. Duan, H. Meling, S. Peisert, and H. Zhang, “BChain: Byzantine Replica- tion with High Throughput and Embedded Reconfiguration,” in Principles of Distributed Systems, 2014, pp. 91–106. [8] M. Wegner, W. Xu, R. Kapitza, and L. Wolf, “Byzantine Consensus in Vehicle Platooning via Inter-Vehicle Communication,” Proceedings of the 4th GI/ITG KuVS Fachgespräch Inter-Vehicle Communication (FG-IVC 2016), Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany, Tech. Rep., 3 2016.