Newfoundland and Labrador Sample Clauses

Newfoundland and Labrador. Civic Holiday (St. John's Regatta Day in locality)
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Newfoundland and Labrador. 5. Pension Benefits Act, 1997, S.N.L. 1996, c. P-4.01. Nova Scotia
Newfoundland and Labrador. In the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, in the period to contract termination, the Company may contract out work to meet the demands of the business. Remote Areas The following cities are defined as Major Metropolitan areas: Aldergrove, XX Xxxxxxxx, ON Burnaby, BC Kitchener, ON Greater Vancouver, BC London, ON Kamloops, XX Xxxxxxx, ON Victoria, BC Xxxxxx, XX Xxxxxxx, XX Sudbury, ON Edmonton, AB Greater Montreal, QC Winnipeg, MB Xxxxxx Xxxx, XX Xxxxxxxx, XX St. Laurent, QC Etobicoke, ON Halifax, NS Xxxxxxx Xxxxxxx, XX Moncton, NB In the period to contract termination the Company will endeavor to only consider contracting out in remote areas where it is economically feasible provided that said areas are unmanned or where a natural vacancy occurs through attrition. Where the Company is considering contracting out in remote areas that are currently manned, the Company and the Union will meet to discuss the impact and mutually agreed on how to proceed. Any layoff notices issued as a result of the above noted policy will be considered a T.O.O. layoff and all applicable articles of the Collective Agreement and Job Security Agreement that deal with T.O.O. will apply: The Company agrees to offer Early Retirement Separation Allowance/Voluntary Severance Allowance packages to affected employees. If there are vacancies elsewhere in the Company, these employees will have the option of bidding on the vacancies. The Company will, upon the employee’s request and with Union agreement, rebalance his position to a major metropolitan area within his District. An employee affected by such a layoff will have the option, if unable to maintain a job within his JSET, of accepting the layoff with full JSA benefits and recall rights. These layoff provisions will also apply to any employees within Newfoundland and Labrador that may be affected by contracting out in their area.
Newfoundland and Labrador. In February 2011, a case was filed on behalf of the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, hereinafter Newfoundland, against Canadian and non-Canadian tobacco-related entities, including RJR Tobacco and one of its affiliates, in the General Trial Division of the Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador. The claim is brought pursuant to legislation passed in Newfoundland in 2001 and proclaimed in February 2011, which is substantially similar to the revised British Columbia statute described above. In this action, the Newfoundland government seeks to recover essentially the same types of damages that are being sought in the British Columbia, New Brunswick and Ontario actions described above based on analogous theories of liability. RJR and its affiliate have brought a motion challenging the jurisdiction of the Newfoundland court. A decision is pending. • Israel - In September 1998, the General Health Services, Israel’s second largest health fund, filed a statement of claim against certain cigarette manufacturers and distributors, including RJR Tobacco, RJR Nabisco and B&W, in the District Court of Jerusalem, Israel. The plaintiff seeks to recover the present value of the total expenditure by the government for health-care benefits provided for insured persons resulting from tobacco-related disease or the risk of tobacco-related disease caused by alleged breaches of duty by the manufacturers, the present value of the estimated total expenditure by the government for health-care benefits that reasonably could be expected to be provided for those insured persons resulting from tobacco-related disease or the risk of tobacco-related disease in the future, court ordered interest, and costs, or in the alternative, special or increased costs. The plaintiff alleges that the defendants are liable under the following theories: defective product, failure to warn, sale of cigarettes to children and adolescents, strict liability, deceit and misrepresentation and violation of trade practice and competition acts. In 2002, the plaintiff obtained leave to serve RJR Tobacco and B&W outside the jurisdiction. On behalf of RJR Tobacco, JTI filed a motion challenging the grant of leave, which was denied. JTI appealed the decision to the Supreme Court of Israel alongside other defendants’ applications for a strike out of the claim. In July 2011, the Israeli Supreme Court granted PMI and BAT’s appeal of the rejection of their motion to strike out the claim. The court found...
Newfoundland and Labrador. It is understood and agreed by the parties to this letter, that all work performed by the companies who’s signatures are affixed thereto shall be governed by the Quality Control Council agreement and the terms and conditions of the appendix for the above captioned Provinces. Wages and Classifications: May 1, 2012 May 1, 2013 May 1, 2014 0 - 1000 hours 17.20 17.88 18.67 1000 - 2500 hours 21.22 22.00 22.91 2500 - 4000 hours 26.84 27.77 28.85 4000 - 6000 hours 28.58 29.54 30.68 Thereafter 35.52 36.66 38.00 Training: The parties further agree that when the trade of Heat Treating Technician is designated and the criterion for certification is in place the parties will meet and amend the agreement accordingly. LETTER OF UNDERSTANDING #3 – OFFSHORE WORK (ATLANTIC REGION) Between Quality Control Council of Canada (QCCC) -and- NDT Management Association The following agreement will apply to offshore NDT work on operating platforms, performed offshore from the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador until April 30, 2012. • All shifts worked offshore from 1 to 21 days will be paid at ST for the first twelve (12) hours. • Overtime will be paid at time and one-half (1.5x) for time worked after twelve (12) hours. • Travel time will be considered as time worked to a maximum of twelve (12) hours in any twenty-four (24) hour period. • Base rates for offshore work will be paid at twenty-five percent (25%) above the regular rate of pay. Example: o ST top rate $38.00 plus $9.50 hr. = $47.50 hr o OT 1.5 = $57.00 plus $9.50 hr. = $66.50 hr o Night shift $38.00 plus $9.50 + $2.00 PM shift = $49.50 hr o OT Night shift $57.00 plus $9.50 plus $2.00 hr. = $68.50 hr If employees are required to remain offshore for more than twenty-one (21) days, an overtime rate of time and one-half (1.5x) will apply for all hours worked, calculated as in the above example. The general shift conditions and overtime provisions in this agreement will extend for the term of any maintenance agreement entered into by a signatory contractor. By mutual consent at any time, both parties may revisit this agreement. Agreed at St. John's, NFLD this 24 day of May 2006. For the QCCC For the NDTMA LETTER OF INTERPRETATION A – MEALS (ATLANTIC REGION) Between Quality Control Council of Canada -and- NDT Management Association The undersigned parties agree to the following interpretation of Article 9.06(b)(ii) for the Atlantic Provinces. The subsistence allowance under the circumstances of Article 9.06(b)(ii) shall be o...
Newfoundland and Labrador. It is understood and agreed by the parties to this letter, that all work performed by the companies who’s signatures are affixed thereto shall be governed by the Quality Control Council agreement and the terms and conditions of the appendix for the above captioned Provinces. Wages and Classifications: June 29, 2009 Nov 1, 2009 May 1, 2010 May 1, 2011 0 - 1000 hours 15.07 15.52 16.07 16.71 1000 - 2500 hours 18.59 19.15 19.82 20.61 2500 - 4000 hours 23.52 24.22 25.07 26.07 4000 - 6000 hours 25.03 25.78 26.68 27.75 Thereafter Training: 31.11 32.04 33.16 34.49 The parties further agree that when the trade of Heat Treating Technician is designated and the criterion for certification is in place the parties will meet and amend the agreement accordingly. LETTER OF UNDERSTANDING # 2 PRACTICAL MENTORING (ATLANTIC REGION) Between Quality Control Council of Canada -and- NDT Management Association The parties agree that some technicians may require additional on the job training in order to have confidence and proficiency as a level II or in advanced specialty methods of inspection. In an effort to make that additional training available to the Technicians the parties agree to implement a “Voluntary Mentoring Program”. All technicians will be provided fair and reasonable access to the mentoring program. Technicians interested in improving their advanced practical skills may request that their employer provide them with additional training through the mentoring program. Technician must sign “Mentoring Agreement” recording, the inspection method, the individuals CGSB qualifications, the length of the training period and the rate of pay. A copy of the agreement must be provided to the QCC regional office for authorization and registration. Technicians registered in the Mentoring program participating in on the job training must be under the constant and immediate supervision of the designated Mentor to which they have been assigned. No mentor may train more than one technician at a time. The technician will receive 80% of the rate to which the employee would otherwise be entitled for the time spent in the registered mentoring program. This voluntary program can be cancelled upon either party providing 30 day written notice and unless both parties agree to renew or extend expires April 30, 2011. For the QCCC For the NDTMA LETTER OF UNDERSTANDING # 3 – OFFSHORE WORK (ATLANTIC REGION) Between Quality Control Council of Canada -and- NDT Management Association The following a...
Newfoundland and Labrador. In connection with the purchase of the Shares, the Subscriber hereby represents, warrants, covenants and certifies that the Subscriber is an “accredited investor” within the meaning of NI 45-106, by virtue of satisfying one of the following criteria (YOU MUST ALSO INITIAL OR PLACE A CHECK-XXXX ON THE APPROPRIATE LINE BELOW):
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Newfoundland and Labrador. No. Secured Party Debtor Registration No.
Newfoundland and Labrador. Miawpukek 82
Newfoundland and Labrador. Core Housing Need Affordability is the primary issue facing households who are in core housing need in the province. A household is considered to be in core housing need if it does not meet at least one of the standards of adequacy, affordability or suitability and it would have to spend 30% or more of its before-tax income to rent in the community in which they live. A household is considered in severe core housing need when this increases to 50%. In recent years, major development projects and other economic drivers have caused significant increases in rental rates in various parts of the province, putting increased affordability pressures on renters. Other direct housing costs such as utilities and property tax have increased as well. The 2016 Census includes the following data on core housing need in Newfoundland and Labrador:  In 2016, 10.3 per cent of households in the province (22,495 households) were deemed to be in core housing need.  The vast majority (87 per cent) of households in core housing need were paying more than 30 per cent of gross income towards housing costs.  Single parent households and one-person households were much more likely to pay 30 per cent or more of gross income toward shelter costs compared to couple-family households.  Of those in severe core housing need, 67% are renters and 33% are homeowners. Over the course of the next nine years, housing investments in Newfoundland and Labrador will provide support to an estimated 19,251 households. Addressing housing need at all stages of the housing continuum will require a variety of approaches.
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