The Beneficiary Sample Clauses

The Beneficiary. A Beneficiary’s status may be changed at any time prior to the Annuity Commencement Date unless you designate such Beneficiary as an Irrevocable Beneficiary. An Irrevocable Beneficiary cannot be changed without the consent of the Irrevocable Beneficiary. You may designate one or more classes of Beneficiaries: (i) primary Beneficiaries and (ii) contingent Beneficiaries. The Death Benefit will be paid to the primary Beneficiary. If all the primary Beneficiaries die before the Annuitant, the contingent Beneficiary shall take the place of, and be deemed to be, the primary Beneficiary. If there are multiple Beneficiaries, the Death Benefit shall be paid in equal shares to all primary Beneficiaries unless you provide Notice to Us directing otherwise. In the case of a single life MGWB, if the Annuitant is the Owner and no Beneficiaries are alive or have been designated at the time of the Annuitant’s death, the Annuitant’s estate will be deemed to be the primary Beneficiary. ICC12 IL-IA-4030 In the case of a Joint and Survivor MGWB, the Annuitant’s spouse will be deemed to be the sole primary Beneficiary notwithstanding any other Beneficiary designation made. In the case of a Joint and Survivor MGWB, if the Annuitant’s spouse is the Owner and no Beneficiaries are alive or have been designated at the time of the Annuitant’s spouse’s death, then the estate of the Annuitant’s spouse will be deemed to be the primary Beneficiary. If the Owner is not a natural person and all Beneficiaries die before the Annuitant (or the Annuitant’s spouse, if applicable), or if no Beneficiary has been designated at the time of the Annuitant’s death (or the Annuitant’s spouse’s death, if applicable), the Owner will be deemed to be the primary Beneficiary. We will deem any Beneficiary to have predeceased the Annuitant, if: (1) Such Beneficiary died at the same time as the Annuitant; (2) Such Beneficiary died within twenty-four hours after the Annuitant’s death; or (3) There is not sufficient evidence to determine that the Beneficiary and Xxxxxxxxx died other than at the same time. To make a Beneficiary change, you must provide Notice to Us. Unless you specify otherwise, such change cancels any existing Beneficiary designations in the same class (primary or contingent) and will take effect as of the date Notice to Us is signed by the Owner, subject to any payments we make or actions we take prior to receipt of such Notice to Us. The rights of any Beneficiary (if a natural person), includi...
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The Beneficiary. The Beneficiary is an individual or entity designated by you to receive the Death Benefit. A Beneficiary’s status may be changed at any time prior to the Maturity Date unless you designate such Beneficiary as an Irrevocable Beneficiary. An Irrevocable Beneficiary cannot be changed without the consent of the Irrevocable Beneficiary. You may designate one or more (i) primary Beneficiaries and (ii) contingent Beneficiaries. These classes set the order under which the Death Benefit is paid. If all the primary Beneficiaries die before any Owner (or, if the Owner is not a natural person, any Annuitant), the contingent Beneficiary shall take the place of, and be deemed to be, the primary Beneficiary, and the Death Benefit will be paid to the contingent Beneficiary. If there are multiple Beneficiaries, the Death Benefit shall be paid in equal shares to all Beneficiaries in the same class (primary or contingent, as applicable) unless you provide Notice to Us directing otherwise. If there are Joint Owners, at the death of the first Owner, any surviving Owner shall take the place of, and be deemed to be, the primary Beneficiary. This will override any other Beneficiary designation. IU-IA-3089 If there is a single natural Owner and all Beneficiaries die before the Owner, or if no Beneficiary has been designated at the time of the Owner’s death, the Owner’s estate will be deemed to be the primary Beneficiary. If the Owner is not a natural person and all Beneficiaries die before any Annuitant, or if no Beneficiary has been designated at the time of any Annuitant's death, the Owner will be deemed to be the primary Beneficiary. We will deem any Beneficiary to have predeceased the Owner if: (1) such Beneficiary died at the same time as the Owner;
The Beneficiary. The Beneficiary may succeed to ownership in accordance with the Rights of Succession section (Article 6, section 6.01)
The Beneficiary. The beneficiary is/are the person(s) nominated by the Contract Owner and entitled to cash the benefits of this Contract in case of death of the Life Assured.
The Beneficiary a) Upon establishment of the Plan the Subscriber shall designate in the space provided on the application a Beneficiary in respect of the Plan.
The Beneficiary. This is the person or entity that will receive the income or principal from the trust. This can be the settlor (and the settlor’s spouse) during his or her lifetime and the settlor’s children (or anyone else or a charity the settlor chooses to name) after the settlor’s death. A trust is classified as a “living” trust when it is established during the settlor’s lifetime and as a “revocable” trust when the settlor has reserved the right to amend or revoke the trust during his or her lifetime. How is a Revocable Living Trust Created? There are two basic steps in creating a revocable living trust. First, an attorney prepares a legal document called a “trust agreement” or a “declaration of trust” or an “indenture of trust” which is signed by the settlor and the trustee. Secondly, the settlor transfers property to the trustee to be held for the benefit of the beneficiary named in the trust document. Can a Revocable Living Trust be Changed or Revoked? Yes. The settlor ordinarily reserves the right in the trust document to amend or revoke the trust at any time during his or her lifetime. This enables the settlor to revise the trust (or even terminate the trust) to take into account any change of circumstances such as marriage, divorce, death, disability or even a “change of mind.” It also gives the settlor the peace of mind that he can “undo” what he has done. Upon the death of the settlor, most revocable living trusts become irrevo- cable and no changes are then allowed (with some exceptions) to save taxes or improve administration. Sometimes the trust becomes irrevocable after the death of a spouse if the trust was jointly created by a married couple. Is a Revocable Living Trust an Adequate Substitute for a Will? No! A revocable living trust may be considered the principal document in an estate plan, but a will should accompany a revocable living trust. This type of will, referred to as a “pour over” will, names the revocable living trust as the principal beneficiary. Thus, any property which the settlor failed to transfer to the trust dur- ing his or her lifetime is added to the trust upon the settlor’s death and distributed to (or held for the benefit of) the beneficiary according to the trust instructions. The settlor may not be able to transfer all desired property to a revocable living trust during the settlor’s lifetime. For example, the probate estate of a person who dies as a result of an auto accident may be entitled to any insurance settlement pro- cee...
The Beneficiary. ...16 What Are the Rights of the Beneficiary.................16
The Beneficiary. The Beneficiary may succeed to ownership in accordance with the Rights of Succession section of the Contract. Ownership succession may occur upon the death of both the Owner and Annuitant. The Owner may name one or more Beneficiaries. If more than one Beneficiary succeeds to ownership of the Contract, each will share ownership equally unless otherwise specified.
The Beneficiary. The Beneficiary is the person to whom we pay the Death Benefit if any Owner dies prior to the Annuity Commencement Date. See "Proceeds Payable to the Beneficiary" for more information. We pay Death Benefits to the primary Beneficiary (unless there are Joint Owners in which case the Death Benefit is payable to the surviving Owner). If the primary Beneficiary dies before the Owner, the Death Benefit is paid to the Contingent Beneficiary, if any. If there is no surviving Beneficiary, we pay the Death Benefit to the Owner's estate.
The Beneficiary. The Beneficiary will receive any remaining Guaranteed Payments due under this Certificate at the death of the Annuitant, and joint Annuitant if applicable, if there is no surviving Certificate Owner or joint Certificate Owner. We pay any remaining Guaranteed Payments to the primary Beneficiary. If the primary Beneficiary dies before the Annuitant, any remaining Guaranteed Payments are paid to the contingent Beneficiary, if any. If there is no contingent Beneficiary, we pay any remaining Guaranteed Payments to the Certificate Owner, if living, otherwise to the Certificate Owner's estate or legal successors. One or more persons may be named as primary Beneficiary or contingent Beneficiary. In the case of more than one Beneficiary, we will assume any remaining Guaranteed Payments are to be paid in equal shares to the surviving Beneficiaries. The Certificate Owner may specify other than equal shares. See Death Benefit Provisions for more information.