LEBANON Sample Clauses

LEBANON. There are no country-specific provisions. LITHUANIA There are no country-specific provisions. MEXICO
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LEBANON. For the purposes of any account(s) or other contractual relationships with Citibank N.A, Lebanon Branch, the taxes which may be deducted or withheld by Citibank pursuant to Section 7 include taxes imposed in the specific and limited circumstances under the United States Internal Revenue Code of 1986 or any associated regulations or other official guidance ("Code"). Citibank, N.A Lebanon Branch is a branch of a banking corporation organized and existing under the laws of the United States and, as such, is subject to Lebanese laws and notably to the Banking Secrecy Law of September 3, 0000, xxx/xx xxxxx xxxx xx xxx Xxxxxx Xxxxxx which do not contradict the imperative provisions of the Lebanese laws. You hereby understand and accept that the national and state laws and regulations of the United States might be applicable to You as long as they do not contravene the imperative provisions of the Lebanese Law on Banking Secrecy and such other imperative Lebanese Laws. Consequently, if You are a U.S. Person (United States Person, entity company or institution), as defined by the Code, at the date of initiating the banking relationship with Citibank, or if afterwards You become a U.S. Person, or are identified by Citibank as a U.S. Person, as of the date of initiating the banking relation with Citibank, You irrevocably release Citibank from any and all losses, claims and liabilities resulting from Citibank’s complying with such laws and regulations concerning You and the Transactions You effect using the System, and in particular you lift the banking secrecy obligation concerning such Transactions under the Lebanese Banking Secrecy Law (i) in relation to Citibank’s compliance with the Code and providing Your information to local or international authorities, including the United States Internal Revenue Service, and (ii) for the purpose of the disclosures referred to in Section 12(b) above.
LEBANON. Key takeaway: Lebanon has made some progress toward financial inclusion, but non- banks have not yet been authorized to provide DFS, limiting innovation. Lebanon faces serious challenges to the expansion of DFS, foremost an economic crisis and high-cost mobile services. Total Population: 6.8 million (2018) Rural Population: 11% Mobile subscriber penetration Internet penetration 66% 78% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Lebanon has been in a state of economic emergency since September 2019. Until the past few years, the banking sector was a strong pillar of the Lebanese economy despite political and security instability. Lebanon has historically received substantial remittances from the expansive Lebanese diaspora (Xxxxxxx 2019). Lebanese workers in the Gulf contributed about one-fifth of Lebanon’s GDP and between 43 and 60 percent of remittances in 2015. However, remittances have been declining in the past few years, largely due to tensions between Lebanon and Saudi Arabia. Remittances to Lebanon decreased by 7 percent in 2017 and are expected to stagnate or fall (Alami 2018). As the government accumulated debt, the banking sector expanded to 425 percent of the country’s GDP (Xxxxxxx 2019). Lebanon’s other main revenue-generating sectors, real estate and tourism, are also not faring well (Alami 2018). These declines, combined with decades of waste and poor governance in the public sector as well as tremendous debt and diminishing trust in the banking sector have led to a financial crisis, street protests, and the resignation of the Prime Minister in October 2019.
LEBANON. Key takeaway: Lebanon has made some progress toward financial inclusion, but non- banks have not yet been authorized to provide DFS, limiting innovation. Lebanon faces serious challenges to the expansion of DFS, foremost an economic crisis and high-cost mobile services. Total Population: 6.8 million (2018) Rural Population: 11% Account Ownership (2017) Mobile subscriber penetration Internet penetration 78% Unbanked 55% Banked 45% 66% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Lebanon has been in a state of economic emergency since September 2019. Until the past few years, the banking sector was a strong pillar of the Lebanese economy despite political and security instability. Lebanon has historically received substantial remittances from the expansive Lebanese diaspora (Xxxxxxx 2019). Lebanese workers in the Gulf contributed about one-fifth of Lebanon’s GDP and between 43 and 60 percent of remittances in 2015. However, remittances have been declining in the past few years, largely due to tensions between Lebanon and Saudi Arabia. Remittances to Lebanon decreased by 7 percent in 2017 and are expected to stagnate or fall (Alami 2018). As the government accumulated debt, the banking sector expanded to 425 percent of the country’s GDP (Xxxxxxx 2019). Lebanon’s other main revenue-generating sectors, real estate and tourism, are also not faring well (Alami 2018). These declines, combined with decades of waste and poor governance in the public sector as well as tremendous debt and diminishing trust in the banking sector have led to a financial crisis, street protests, and the resignation of the Prime Minister in October 2019. Health Sector Overview In Lebanon, for-profit and nonprofit private health entities dominate the health care system. Primary, secondary, and tertiary care, including specialized and general medical services, are available through the private health sector. Most providers who practice in Lebanon and over 90 percent of laboratories and pharmacies are part of the private health sector. However, regulation of both private and public services through the Lebanese government is limited. The Ministry of Public Health plays a significant role in health care with contracting through both government and private facilities. Slightly under half of Lebanese citizens are covered by health insurance schemes, with the remaining uninsured citizens able to use services provided by the Ministry of Public Health. The dominant sources of health financing in Lebanon are out-of- po...
LEBANON. NOTIFICATIONS
LEBANON. Lebanon became eligible to CDM relatively late, since it ratified the Kyoto Protocol (Nov. 2006) and established the DNA (May 2007). The second national communication of Lebanon has estimated the overall emission reduction potential to 20 million tCO2e by year 2030, over the five major emitting sources (Energy, Industrial processes, Agriculture, Forestry and Waste). The energy sector is the most promising GHG mitigation source, as it contributes to 82% of this long term potential. Mitigation measures in the energy sector combine high potentials (led by the electrical sector with 68% of the overall mitigation potential and the transportation 11%) with much lower potential (buildings 2% and manufacturing industries 2%). The waste sector ranks second, contributing to 15% of the mitigation potential. It should however be noted that the mitigation assessment is incomplete, as it did not estimate emission reduction potential resulting from industrial processes and forestry measures. Measures related to Agriculture were also only partially identified and estimated. Furthermore, the energy sector measures were not fully identified and estimated. For instance, emission reduction potential from thermal insulation in existing buildings and fuel switching in manufacturing industries were not included in the estimate. In addition, a number of energy efficiency measures to be implemented in the short and medium terms were not included in the mitigation assessment. Among them, some significant projects identified by the National Energy Efficiency Action Plan (NEEAP) for Lebanon: • Energy efficiency for lighting: Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL) dissemination program, banning the Import of Incandescent Lamps, Efficient and Economic Public Street Lighting. • Solar Water Heaters for Buildings and Institutions. • Promotion of Energy Efficiency in Industry (Energy Auditing, Energy Services Company (ESCO) Business, etc.). • Promotion of Energy Efficient Equipment (e.g. Energy Labelling for electrical appliances, efficient motors for industries, etc.) When synthesizing the available information in Lebanon, covering the NEEAP and the projects that are identified as CDM ones, the potential mitigation options that could be achieved through short term options would add-up to 2 to
LEBANON. Lebanon in a small country on the Mediterranean sea, which is bordered by Syria to the East and North and Israel to the South. The current population is estimated to be 6,237,738 (CIA Factbook, 2016). Since the end of its 15-year civil war in 1990, Lebanon has been politically unstable. In 2011, the civil war in Syria started. There was a major influx of Syrian refugees especially in 2013, during which time over 1 million refugees entered the country (UNHCR, 2017). Lebanon does not allow refugee camps to be established; therefore, Syrian refugees that cannot afford to live in housing live in informal tented settlements across the country. The Lebanese National Tuberculosis Programme worried that the large number of refugees would cause an increase in the number of TB cases in Lebanon, similar to what has been found in other refugee contexts (Kimbrough, Saliba, Dahab, Haskew, & Xxxxxxx, 2012).
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LEBANON. The Government of Lebanon has ratified the Instruments amending the Constitution and the Convention of the International Telecommunication Union (Minneapolis, 1998). The International Telecommunication Union confirms that the deposit of this instrument with the Secretary-General was registered on 1 April 2004. Instruments amending the Constitution and the Convention of the International Telecommunication Union Marrakesh, 2002
LEBANON. The Government of Lebanon has ratified the Final Acts of the World Radiocommunication Conference, Istanbul, 2000. The International Telecommunication Union confirms that the deposit of this instrument with the Secretary-General was registered on 1 April 2004. Special Agreement Federal Republic of Germany, Austria, Belgium, Republic of Croatia, France Repuplic of Hungary, Italy, Principality of Liechtenstein, Republic of Lithuania, Luxembourg, Kingdom of the Netherlands, Republic of Poland, Slovak Republic, Czech Republic, Romania, Republic of Slovenia, Confederation of Switzerland The attention of the Administrations is drawn to the fact that an Agreement was signed on 28 November 2003 in Berlin by the representatives of the above-mentioned Administrations, on the coordination of frequencies between 29,7 MHz and 39,5 GHz for the Fixed Service and the Land Mobile Service.
LEBANON. To view the Shop & Ship Lebanon Terms and Conditions, please click here. UAE: To view the Shop & Ship UAE Terms and Conditions, please click here. This Shop and Ship Account agreement is made and entered into by and between Aramex International LLC (“Aramex”, “we”, “our”) and the individual or entity identified in the Shop and Ship Application Form (referred to as “You” or “your”). Your use of the Shop and Ship service (“Service”) is subject to these terms and conditions (“Terms and Conditions”). The Service is provided to you under these Terms and Conditions and any updates thereof or amendments thereto, and any related operating rules and policies that are published from time to time by Aramex on the Shop and Ship website (xxx.xxxxxxxxxxx.xxx). The Shop and Ship Account (“Account”) shall be subject to the following Terms and Conditions: Definitions and Interpretation
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