Costs and Benefits Sample Clauses

Costs and Benefits. 1. Each party shall bear all the costs and expenses deriving from the Activity it has to conduct as provided in the annexed Project Proposal.
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Costs and Benefits. Notwithstanding any term or provision of this Section 8.12 to the contrary, without limiting the right of the Administrative Agent or the Lenders to require a Lien or a security interest in the Equity Interests of, or guaranty from, any newly acquired or created Subsidiary of the Borrower, or a Lien or security interests on any assets or properties of the Borrower or any of its Subsidiaries, so long as no Event of Default has occurred and is continuing, the Borrower may request in writing to the Lenders that the Lenders waive the requirements of this Section 8.12 to provide a Lien, security interest or guaranty, as the case may be, due to the cost or burden thereof to the Borrower and its Subsidiaries (when taken as a whole) being unreasonably excessive relative to the benefit that would inure to the Secured Parties, and describing such cost or burden in reasonable detail. Upon receipt of any such written notice, the Lenders shall review and consider such request in good faith and, within five (5) Business Days of receipt of such request, shall determine in their sole but commercially reasonable discretion, and notify the Borrower of such determination, whether the Lenders will grant such request for a waiver.
Costs and Benefits. Notwithstanding any term or provision of this Section 8.12 to the contrary, without limiting the right of the Agent or the Lenders to require a Lien or a security interest in the Equity Interests of, or guaranty from, any newly acquired or created Subsidiary of Parent, or a Lien or security interest on any assets or properties of Parent or any of its Subsidiaries, so long as no Event of Default has occurred and is continuing, Parent and the Borrower may request in writing to the Agent that the Majority Lenders waive the requirements of this Section 8.12 to provide a Lien, security interest or guaranty, as the case may be, due to the cost or burden thereof to Parent and its Subsidiaries (when taken as a whole) being unreasonably excessive relative to the benefit that would inure to the Secured Parties, and describing such cost or burden in reasonable detail. Upon receipt of any such written notice, the Agent shall review and consider such request with the Lenders in good faith and, within five (5) Business Days of receipt of such request, the Majority Lenders (after consultation with the Agent) shall determine in their sole but commercially reasonable discretion, and notify Parent and the Borrower of such determination, whether the Majority Lenders will grant such request for a waiver. With respect to any Subsidiary for which the requirement to provide a Lien, security interest or Guaranty, as the case may be, has been waived by the Agent and the Majority Lenders in accordance with this Section 8.12(c), such waiver may be terminated by the Agent and the Majority Lenders if they determine in their sole but commercially reasonable discretion that the cost or burden of providing such Lien, security interest or Guaranty is no longer unreasonably excessive relative to the benefits that would inure to the Secured Parties. If such waiver is terminated, such Subsidiary shall be required to comply with the requirements of this Section 8.12.
Costs and Benefits. Following approval of this Outline Business Case the project has progressed to developing the Final Business Case, and has started to develop the Implementation Plan. This includes a detailed Service Specification and more detailed financial information. See Appendix C for a high-level timeline of the project.
Costs and Benefits. Each party shall bear all the costs and expenses deriving from the Activity it has to conduct as provided in the annexed Project Proposal. Costs and expenses deriving from a common shared activity have to be supported equally by both Parties. Any different agreement between the Parties regarding what is expressed by paragraph 1 and 2 of this article has to be agreed between the Parties in written form.
Costs and Benefits. The Agency has determined that this rule is not a significant regulatory action as defined by Executive Order 12866.
Costs and Benefits. A. Northwest and Gulfstream agree that the rights and obligations of the parties set forth in this Agreement (“Rights and Obligations”) will benefit Northwest and Gulfstream by increasing the number and yield of paying passengers and making NW’s frequent flyer program more competitive with frequent flyer programs offered by other carriers. Northwest and Gulfstream also agree that the Rights and Obligations will subject Northwest and Gulfstream to additional costs in terms of additional administration and management, displacement, dilution, and passenger-related costs for additional passengers from Program Awards. Any payment between the parties with respect to this Agreement is intended to balance the costs and benefits as between the parties.
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Costs and Benefits. “It is expensive, but the benefit is phenomenal. Think of a 7-year-old child that changes schools in one year—that’s when you’re supposed to be learning to read. They don’t learn to read! They get to have some things stay the same. Homelessness is always due to a crisis: it’s a divorce, it’s fleeing domestic violence, it’s a family getting kicked out of their home because they don’t have enough money. I don’t think the financial cost is that great compared to the benefits.” —A Homeless Liaison 22 Administrative costs were reported for a typical one-month period by six providers; given that PSESD outsourced the administrative function, the district’s administrative costs are listed as zero. What Modes of Transportation Were Preferred? By Students? By Parents? By Transportation Coordinators and Homeless Liaisons? Why? Overall, students and parents interviewed in this study were satisfied with and appreciative of the transportation to the school of origin. Elementary school students liked staying with their friends and having the stability of familiar teachers and classmates. Older students offered mixed responses, some citing the same factors as younger students with the addition of a girl- or boyfriend. Others had developed social networks outside of school, including at places of work, and for them staying in the school of origin seemed less significant. Homeless liaisons saw multiple benefits for students to stay in their SOO, including increased stability in an otherwise tumultuous life and the chance to do better academically. Below are summarized perceptions and preferences expressed by users and implementers about the various modes of homeless student transport. Private Vehicles Students and parents agreed that transportation by private vehicle was a preferred mode, as it offered the most freedom, flexibility, time efficiency, and perceived safety with the least chance for negative stigma associated with being ‘different’ or homeless. School district officials also liked the option of providing gas vouchers and mileage reimbursement to subsidize private vehicles for several reasons: there was little administrative hassle coordinating with service providers or routing a school bus; gas vouchers actually resulted in increased attendance by older students in one district; and in another district the use of gas vouchers reduced demand for school-supplied transportation enough to allow it to buy one less van. However many homeless families do not own or ha...
Costs and Benefits. Notwithstanding any term or provision of this Section 8.12 to the contrary, without limiting the right of the Agent or the Lenders to require a Lien or a security interest in the Equity Interests of, or guaranty from, any newly acquired or created Subsidiary of the Borrower (or any Subsidiary of the Borrower that ceases to be an Immaterial Subsidiary), or a Lien or security interest on any assets or properties of the Borrower or any of its Subsidiaries, so long as no Event of Default has occurred and is continuing, the Borrower may request in writing to the Agent that the Majority Lenders waive the requirements of this Section 8.12 to provide a Lien, security interest or guaranty, as the case may be, due to the cost or burden thereof (including any adverse tax consequences) to the Borrower and its Subsidiaries (when taken as a whole) being unreasonably excessive relative to the benefit that would inure to the Secured Parties therefrom, and describing such cost or burden in reasonable detail. Upon receipt of any such written notice, the Agent shall review and consider such request with the Lenders in good faith and, within five (5) Business Days of receipt of such request, the Majority Lenders (after consultation with the Agent) shall determine in their sole but commercially reasonable discretion, and notify the Borrower of such determination, whether the Majority Lenders will grant such request for a waiver.
Costs and Benefits. The NRC prepared a draft regulatory analysis to quantify the costs and benefits of the proposed rule, as well as to examine the qualitative factors to be considered in the NRC’s rulemaking decision. The analysis concluded that the proposed rule would result in net costs to the industry. The proposed rule, relative to the regulatory baseline, would result in a net cost to industry of between $2.4 million based on a 7 percent net present value and $3.4 million based on a 3 percent net present value. The estimated average net cost per licensee or other entity site would be a one-time cost of $5,031 and an annual cost of $2,516. Thirteen qualitative factors were evaluated in the draft regulatory analysis: Public health (accident), occupational health (accident), offsite property, onsite property, regulatory efficiency, safeguards and security considerations, and other considerations (public perception, public trust, worker productivity, improved protection of individual rights, work environment free of drugs and the effects of such substances, safety vulnerability, and security vulnerability). The draft regulatory analysis includes a narrative discussion of each qualitative factor. If the results of the regulatory analysis were based solely on the costs and the benefits that could be quantified, then the regulatory analysis would show that rulemaking is not justified because the total estimated quantified benefits of the proposed regulatory action do not equal or exceed the estimated costs of the proposed regulatory action. However, when the qualitative benefits are considered, together with the quantified benefits, then the benefits outweigh the identified quantitative and qualitative impacts. In the draft regulatory analysis, the NRC concluded that the proposed rule should be adopted because it would result in a 10- to 12-percent increase per year in the detection of individuals using drugs or attempting to subvert the drug testing process. In comparison to the test results from calendar years 2013 and 2014, the estimated increase in detection each year is equivalent to identifying approximately 95 additional individuals using illegal drugs, misusing legal drugs, or attempting to subvert the drug testing process. This improved detection would prevent drug-using individuals from gaining or maintaining unescorted access authorization to NRC-licensed facilities (i.e., operating nuclear power reactors, nuclear power reactors under construction, and Category I fu...
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