Sleep Sample Clauses

Sleep. This expected outcome requires that “care recipients are able to achieve natural sleep patterns”. Team’s findings The home meets this expected outcome Care recipients’ usual sleep patterns are identified soon after entering the home and this knowledge assists staff to support care recipients to achieve natural sleep patterns in the home. Rising and settling times are known and supported by the staff. Strategies used to manage disturbed sleep include the provision of reassurance, warm/cool drinks and a snack, re-positioning and toiletting or continence care. Any potential impacts on natural sleep are identified and addressed, and noise levels are kept to a minimum at night. Where required, referral may be made to the medical officer if sleep disturbances continue. Flexible routines for care recipients assist in optimising sleep and rest. Care recipients are satisfied with the support provided by staff to achieve their natural sleep and rest patterns.Standard 3 – Care recipient lifestyle Principle: Care recipients retain their personal, civic, legal and consumer rights, and are assisted to achieve control of their own lives within the residential care service and in the community.
Sleep. This expected outcome requires that “care recipients are able to achieve natural sleep patterns”. Team’s findingsThe home meets this expected outcome Clinical assessments and consultation with care recipients/representatives identify care recipients preferred routines for sleep and rest. Care plans include individualised information such as preferred time to settle for the night, prompting to toilet, continence aids, nightlights, number of pillows and blankets, and wake time. Staff assist care recipients to settle for a rest during the day according to the care recipient’s needs and preferences. Night staff monitor care recipients and provide comfort measures such as toileting, continence care and pain management. Staff have access to catering supplies through the night if care recipients require drinks or snacks. Care recipients say the home is quiet at night and care recipients/representatives are satisfied with the assistance provided for care recipients to sleep and rest.Standard 3 – Care recipient lifestylePrinciple: Care recipients retain their personal, civic, legal and consumer rights, and are assisted to achieve control of their own lives within the residential care service and in the community.
Sleep. This expected outcome requires that “residents are able to achieve natural sleep patterns”. Team’s findingsThe home meets this expected outcome Individual resident care plans are developed using focused assessment which document previous sleep pattern and settling routines. Residents experiencing difficulty achieving natural sleep are reassessed and interventions implemented include environmental changes, low lighting, warm drinks and snacks, referral to medical officers and pharmaceutical interventions. Resident meetings are a forum to discuss environmental impacts to sleep including temperature and noise levels. Staff support natural sleep patterns through reduced noise level, low lighting and closing curtain/doors. A slide and draw sheet system is employed to minimise disturbing resident sleep during pressure area care. Residents/ representatives are satisfied they are supported to achieve natural sleepStandard 3 – Resident lifestylePrinciple: Residents retain their personal, civic, legal and consumer rights, and are assisted to achieve control of their own lives within the residential care service and in the community.
Sleep. This expected outcome requires that “residents are able to achieve natural sleep patterns”. Team’s findingsThe home meets this expected outcome Practices at the home assist residents achieve natural sleep patterns. The assessment process identifies residents’ natural sleep patterns and preferences for day and night rest. Care plans detail individual preferences and needs including comfort measures to promote sleep, individual rituals and strategies and preferences for retiring and waking. Staff described strategies to help resettle any resident who wakes during the night. The home monitors the night time environment and resident satisfaction through the quality program and care plan consultation. Residents and representatives said residents could rest whenever they wished.Standard 3 – Resident lifestylePrinciple: Residents retain their personal, civic, legal and consumer rights, and are assisted to achieve control of their own lives within the residential care service and in the community.
Sleep. This expected outcome requires that “care recipients are able to achieve natural sleep patterns”. Team’s findingsThe home meets this expected outcome There are processes to assist care recipients achieve natural sleep patterns where able. Staff complete sleep assessments to determine natural sleeping patterns and settling preferences or requirements and consider pain, nutrition, skin care, behaviour and continence requirements which may impact on care recipients’ sleep. Care plans provide specific strategies to encourage a natural sleep which include settling and waking times, bedding and environmental preferences. Staff ensure care recipients are comfortable, free from pain where possible, noise and light is at a minimum, warm drinks are provided when required and medication is used to promote sleep when needed. Care recipients said the home is quiet at night and they sleep well.Standard 3 – Care recipient lifestylePrinciple: Care recipients retain their personal, civic, legal and consumer rights, and are assisted to achieve control of their own lives within the residential care service and in the community.
Sleep. This expected outcome requires that “residents are able to achieve natural sleep patterns”. Team’s recommendationDoes comply Systems are in place to assess, plan, manage and review residents’ sleep patterns. When residents move into the home care staff observe and assess residents’ sleep patterns and preferences before preparing care plans. Non-chemical interventions used to encourage sleep include warm drinks and snacks, pain and continence management, and reassurance. Care staff maintain a quiet environment at a comfortable temperature, and dim lights at night. Staff routines at night are planned to cause as little disruption as possible. Residents interviewed by the team state that generally they are able to sleep without disruption.Standard 3 – Resident lifestylePrinciple: Residents retain their personal, civic, legal and consumer rights, and are assisted to achieve control of their own lives within the residential care service and in the community.
Sleep. This expected outcome requires that “residents are able to achieve natural sleep patterns”. Team’s recommendationDoes comply Resident sleep patterns are assessed on entry to the home including preferred sleeping times and number of pillows/blankets, and any history of night sedation. Barriers to natural sleep including pain, continence, hunger, emotional state are considered when planning care. Alternatives to sedation include consideration of environmental issues such as lighting and noise, and use of massage and heat therapy. Residents confirm they are assisted to settle and maintain their sleep patterns.Standard 3 – Resident lifestylePrinciple: Residents retain their personal, civic, legal and consumer rights, and are assisted to achieve control of their own lives within the residential care service and in the community.
Sleep. This expected outcome requires that “care recipients are able to achieve natural sleep patterns”. Team’s findings The home meets this expected outcome Assessment processes and care planning assists care recipients to get adequate sleep and rest. Nursing staff identify care recipients’ sleep needs and preferences using ongoing assessments, care reviews and observation. Care plans detail individual strategies including comfort measures to promote sleep, settling rituals and preferences for day rest, retiring and waking. Past life histories, pain management, immobility, continence care and escalation of behaviours are defined precursors to disturbed sleep patterns and are integral to individual care planning. Staff described strategies to help resettle any care recipient who wakes during the night including offering comfort care and medications when appropriate. Care recipients and representatives are satisfied with staff assistance to help care recipients get sufficient rest and sleep.Standard 3 – Care recipient lifestyle Principle: Care recipients retain their personal, civic, legal and consumer rights, and are assisted to achieve control of their own lives within the residential care service and in the community.
Sleep. What time does your child go to sleep at night?.......................................................................................................................................................... What time does your child wake up in the morning? ................................................................................................................................................ How long does your child sleep during the day? ........................................................................................................................................................ Does your child take a special toy to bed? ....................................................................................................................................................................Does your child have any special routine of being put to bed? YES NO If YES, please give details: ................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Other Comments: .....................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Sleep. You will have the opportunity for eight hours of sleep and will be required to wake between 6 and 8 am every morning. This routine allows you to take advantage of daylight and promotes health. Participants go to bed when the leaders do. Accommodations are never coed and are strictly for sleeping.