Adaptive definition

Adaptive means age appropriate skills related to taking care of one’s self and the ability to relate to others in daily living situations. These skills include limitations that occur in the areas of communication, self-care, home living, social skills, community use, self-direction, safety, functional academics, leisure and work.
Adaptive front lighting system" (or "AFS") means a lighting device type- approved according to Regulation No. 123, providing beams with differing characteristics for automatic adaptation to varying conditions of use of the dipped-beam (passing-beam) and, if it applies, the main-beam (driving- beam).
Adaptive means that a person is flexible in approach and is able to adjust to different circumstances.

Examples of Adaptive in a sentence

Rock, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Pill: Adaptive Responses to Takeover Law, 69 U.

Adaptive Reuse is also identified as a category on the Franchise Application.

The teacher’s assessment will take into consideration factors which may include, but are not limited to, updated i-Ready Adaptive Diagnostic scores, the student’s classroom assignments, quizzes, tests, exams, and grades, classroom participation, and any comments provided by the student, the student’s parent/legal guardian, and/or the student’s other teachers regarding the student’s mathematics placement.

Adaptive re-use and rehabilitation projects must comply to the extent doing so is economically feasible and as allowed by historic preservation rules.

Adaptive resistance to therapeutic PD-1 blockade is associated with upregulation of alternative immune checkpoints.


More Definitions of Adaptive

Adaptive means age-appropriate skills related to taking care of one’s self and one’s ability to relate to others in daily living situations. These skills include limitations that occur in the areas of
Adaptive means Adaptive Biotechnologies Corporation and its Affiliates existing immediately prior to the Change of Control transaction.
Adaptive means that a person is flexible in approach and is able to adjust in different circumstances. ‘Positive behaviour’ implies that a person is forward looking and even in difficult situations, can find a ray of hope and opportunities to find solutions.
Adaptive means Adaptive Insights, Inc. and/or its subsidiaries, as indicated on your Order. “Agreement” means this Master Subscription Agreement.
Adaptive means that a person is flexible in approach and is able to adjust in different circumstances. ‘Positive behavior’ implies that a person is forward looking and even in difficult situations, can find a ray of hope and opportunities to find solutions. The termsLivelihood skills’ or occupational/ vocational skills refer to capabilities, resources and opportunities to pursue individual and household economic goals and relate to income generation. Thus, Life skills are distinct from livelihood skills.
Adaptive means that they can sense changes in their environment and respond in a way that maintains or promotes their function, typically with a single predetermined outcome.
Adaptive means that the change in the coupling C contributes to the maintenance of some of the processes that constitute S. This definition has the advantage of being at the same time generative (i.e. our three requirements for agency follow from it), and non-circular (it does not rely on terms presupposing the notion of agency). Statement 1 captures the requirement for individuality. An important aspect here is the precariousness of the system. The organization not only defines the system, but it is also thanks to it that the system endures in time, as without it the component processes would run down (i.e. the system is self- sustaining). Normativity in turn emerges from exactly this property, i.e. from the manner in which specific interactions can either help support or threaten to break down the system's self-maintenance. Statement 2 captures the requirement of interactional asymmetry. There is a specific sense in which the system is the source of actions, for not only is it modulating the coupling, but it is doing so in relation 2 I.e. we cannot think of any examples of systems that satisfy all three conditions without considering them agents, nor can we think of any empirical agents that fail to satisfy any one of these conditions. to intrinsic norms. In other words, it is the organization of the system (from which the norms emerge) that is determining the modulation of the coupling. Although the set of criteria and the generative definition proposed can already be put to use to determine whether or not a system is an agent, it would be desirable to further ground the concept in the specific organizational properties that minimal examples of agency have to possess in order to meet our definition. In the next chapter we will look at two candidates: agency grounded in the biological organization of living systems; and agency grounded in the autonomy of sensorimotor organizations.