Meaningful definition

Meaningful means that the offer is reasonably calculated to settle the case on terms acceptable to the offering party. “Meaningful” does not include an offer which the offering party knows will not be acceptable to the other party.
Meaningful means that the offer is reasonably calculated to settle the case on terms acceptable to the offering
Meaningful means significant, consequential, essential, important, purposeful, rel- evant, substantial, or useful, and appears to have been employed to distinguish from mere abstract, pro forma, courtesy, or trivial control. See, e.g., Johnson v. Commissioner of Internal Revenue, 78 T.C. 882 (1982); Hess v. Port Authority Trans-Hudson Corp., 513 U.S. 30, 55 (1994); N.L.R.B. v. Curtin Matheson Scientific, Inc., 494 U.S. 775, 800 (1990); Saxbe

Examples of Meaningful in a sentence

  • Meaningful access may entail providing language assistance services, including oral and written translation, where necessary.

  • Meaningful engagement of parents, pupils, and other stakeholders, including those representing the subgroups identified in Education Code section 52052, is critical to the LCAP and budget process.

  • Meaningful assessment and evaluation of NSF funded projects should be based on appropriate metrics, keeping in mind the likely correlation between the effect of broader impacts and the resources provided to implement projects.

  • Please describe (i.e., grade, description of unit, partnerships, etc.):No evidence that students in this grade participated in a Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience.

  • Please describe (i.e., grade, description of unit, partnerships, etc.):Some classes participated in a Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience.


More Definitions of Meaningful

Meaningful here means a substantial change in the source code, rather than something more administrative, such as correcting a typo. There are a number of ways to considerrecent.’ CHAOSS, a Linux Foundation project looking at Community Health Analytics of Open Source Software, notes the varying levels of nuance that could be used when analyzing frequency of commits. For example, CHAOSS notes it could be useful to distinguish between the number of commits made and the number of commiters, or number of commits and the number of lines of code added or changed per commit. See “Metrics With Greater Utility: The Community Manager Use Case.” CHAOSS, 25 Feb. 2019,
Meaningful means an offer that is reasonably calculated to settle the dispute. “Meaningful” is not an offer that the party knows has no hope of settling the dispute.
Meaningful means as follows:
Meaningful means that assessments allow valid and reliable inferences to be drawn about what students know or can do, and what their next steps should be.
Meaningful means periods of time that occur daily with value or purpose used for participating with a child in routine activities, including but not limited to bathtime, bedtime, homework, transporting a child to or from school, etc., and shall include the right of first refusal.
Meaningful means that an eligible child’s program affords him or her the opportunity for “significant learning.” Ridgewood. An eligible Student is denied FAPE if his or her program is not likely to produce progress, or if the program affords the child only a “trivial” or “de minimiseducational benefit. M.C. v. Central Regional School District, 81 F.3d 389, 396 (3rd Cir. 1996), cert. den. 117 S. Ct. 176 (1996); Polk.
Meaningful means significant, consequential, essential, important, purposeful, relevant, substantial, or useful, and appears to have been employed to distinguish from mere abstract, pro forma, courtesy, or trivial control. See, e.g., Johnson v. Commissioner of Internal Revenue, 78 T.C. 882 (1982); Hess v. Port Authority Trans-Hudson Corp., 513 U.S. 30, 55 (1994); N.L.R.B. v. Curtin Matheson Scientific, Inc., 494 U.S. 775, 800 (1990); Saxbe v. Washington Post Co., 417 U.S. 843, 863 (1974); Franza v. Royal Caribbean Cruises, Ltd., 772 F.3d 1225, 1239 (11th Cir. 2014); Raphan v. United States, 759 F.2d 879, 883 (Fed. Cir. 1985); Bartz v. United States, 633 F.2d 571, 576 (Ct. Cl. 1980); Vnuk v. C.I.R., 621 F.2d 1318, 1320-1321 (8th Cir. 1980). Review of these and numerous other decisions that have required “meaningful” control in various contexts did not reveal that particular legal contours have been elucidated to make “meaningful” mean anything more than the ordinary meaning of “control”.