Chapter 3 definition

Chapter 3 means chapter 3 of the Internal Revenue Code of the United States (Withholding of Tax on Nonresident Aliens and Foreign Corporations). Chapter 3 contains sections 1441 through 1464.
Chapter 3 means Sections 1441 through 1464 and the regulations thereunder, but does not include Sections 1445 and 1446 and the regulations thereunder, unless the context indicates otherwise.

Examples of Chapter 3 in a sentence

  • Chapter 3 of POPI provides for the minimum Conditions for Lawful Processing of Personal Information by a Responsible Party.

  • The social worker follows the requirements of Chapter 3 of this manual regarding identification of a child’s Indian status.2. The social worker documents a child’s Indian status in the service record on a Family Ancestry Chart, DSHS 04-220(x), and the Indian Identity Request Form, DSHS 09-761.3. Before beginning an adoption process, the social worker must make all reasonable efforts to have the Indian child enrolled in the child’s Tribe.

  • CTST projects that result in new facilities or significant renovations without professional approval may be directed to be removed.(See Chapter 3, Section 3.3, R10 Career Technical Skills Training (CTST) Projects.) R7.

  • Documentation of the process for assessing students for disabilities, and programs for providing students with special education, if the center is subject to the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA) or Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (see Chapter 3, Section 3.2, R5.d ).

  • Purpose and definitions Chapter 2: Compulsory pilotage Chapter 3: PilotsChapter 4: Pilotage exemption Chapter 5: Pilotage fee etc.Chapter 6: Inspection, withdrawal etc.


More Definitions of Chapter 3

Chapter 3. SIRT2 Directs DNA-PKcs in the DNA Damage Response [In Preparation for Publication]
Chapter 3. The relationship between women’s autonomy and empowerment and gender norms in Southern Africa 52 Introduction 52 Pre-colonial gender traditions 53 Colonial influence on gender relations 60 Early anthropology of matriliny in Malawi 65 Contemporary gender policy in Malawi 73 Chapter 4: Measuring women’s empowerment 82 Introduction 82 What is empowerment? 83 Women’s empowerment versus gender equity 83 National-level indices 86 Social choice theory 90 CARE’s frameworks 93 The Women’s Empowerment Multi-dimensional Evaluation of Agency, Social Capital, and Relations 94 Agency 96 Social capital 101 Relations 106 Chapter 5: Context of women’s empowerment outcomes and autonomy in rural Malawi ......................................................................................................................................... 109 Economic independence 109 Employment and form of earnings 110 Control over earnings 116 Education 120 Gender attitudes and beliefs 121 Household decision-making 121 Right to refuse sex 123 Experience of violence 125 Tolerance of intimate-partner violence 125 Physical violence 126 Sexual violence 128 Control in marital unions 129 Intimate Partner Violence 129 Summary 131 Chapter 6: Results of women’s empowerment survey 134 Independent variables 139 Women’s empowerment domains 158 Associations between matrilocality and women’s empowerment outcomes ..................................................................................................................170 Summary 171 Chapter 7: Association between matrilineal residence/community and women’s empowerment across the domains 173 Results: 174 Chapter 8: Conclusion 216 Introduction 216 Hypotheses 220 Methodology 221 Results 223 Agency Error! Bookmark not defined. Summary of results 235 Limitations and Future Recommendations 239 Applicability of findings for global health and development interventions ................................................................................................................. 249 Findings in ethnographic context 252 Bibliography 256 Annex 1: Women’s Empowerment—Multi-dimensional Evaluation of Agency, Social Capital, and Relations (WE-MEASR) Survey Tool 270 Annex 2: Distribution of Responses to WE-MEASR Sub-Scales 311 Annex 3. ANOVA results for model selection 338 Annex 4: Model Selection 340 Annex 5: Comparison of Results Across Models 375 List of Tables
Chapter 3. APPRECIATING RELIGION AS A HEALTH ASSET: THE TURN TO RELIGION IN AN HIV-INFECTED WORLD I. Introduction 83
Chapter 3. A specific subset of Drosophila Myc sites remains associated with mitotic chromosomes co-localized with insulator proteins Abstract 81 Introduction 82 Results 85 Myc is present at the promoters of paused genes 85 The role of Myc at non-promoter regions 86 Myc associates with Orc2 genome-wide in D. melanogaster 87 A distinct subset of Myc sites remains bound to chromosomes during mitosis 88 The two classes of Myc sites may have different roles in gene expression 99 Mitotic Myc sites are present at a subset of promoters but not enhancers 90 Myc sites of unknown function associate with insulators 91 Myc mitotic sites associate with mitotic insulator sites 92 Mitotic Myc sites are enriched at the borders of topological chromosomal domains 93 Discussion 95 Methods 98 Acknowledgements 102 Chapter 4: Discussion 115 Reference 121 List of Tables Table 2-1. Percentage of genes in head-to-head (<1kb) gene pairs for different species 44 Table 2-2. Expression information for genes in Figure 2-5C 46 Table 2-3. Summary of sequence data 48 Table 2-4. Summary of BEAF-32 binding sites at intergenic regions affecting body size 50 List of Figures Figure 2-1. BEAF-32 specifically associates with close head-to-head gene pairs 52 Figure 2-2. BEAF-32 is enriched between head-to-head gene pairs. 54 Figure 2-3. Percentage of head-to-head gene pairs in protein associated gene pairs 56 Figure 2-4. Distance between TSSs of gene pairs 58 Figure 2-5. BEAF-32-associated close head-to-head genes are not co-expressed 60 Figure 2-6. Correlation of expression for gene pairs 62 Figure 2-7. BEAF-32 separates close head-to-head gene pairs to achieve differential regulation of transcription 64 Figure 2-8. Clustering of BEAF-32, other Drosophila insulator proteins, and various histone modifications in D. melanogaster S2 cells 66 Figure 2-9. Conservation and divergence of BEAF-32 sites in Drosophila species 68 Figure 2-10. BEAF-32 binding across Drosophila species 70 Figure 2-11. Changes in BEAF-32 binding correlate with changes in genome organization and function 72 Figure 2-12. Simplified models for the role of BEAF-32 during evolution of Drosophila species 74 Figure 2-13. Conservation of BEAF-32 protein sequences in the four Drosophila species analyzed 76 Figure 2-14. Immunofluorescence microscopy of polytene chromosomes of different Drosophila species using an antibody against the D. melanogaster BEAF-32B 78 Figure 3-1. Characteristics of Myc-associated genes 103 Figure 3-2. A subset of Myc si...
Chapter 3. Rationalism Hayy’s Rational Foundations The material world is exactly the world with which Ibn Tufayl begins his philosophical tale. With the early part of the story, ibn Tufayl lays the rational foundation of Hayy’s religious beliefs. This foundation is the edifice on which ibn Tufayl builds towards his rational-mysticism. An essential difference between al-Farabi and ibn Tufayl is found in the ability to know God. Thus, in the summary of the first years of Hayy’s life, it is important to pay attention to Hayy’s slow progression away from matter to the interconnected nature of the incorporeal. On a certain island off the coast of India and situated below the equator lived the man born without parents, Hayy.38 His home was an island where “humans are created without a father or a mother and where trees bear women as fruit.”39 Ibn Tufayl holds that such miraculous births are possible because this island has the most perfect of conditions in all the regions of earth.40 Fortunately for Hayy, there were no predatory animals on the island and he was nursed by a doe until the age of two.
Chapter 3. Zika Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon Responses During Infection of Human Dendritic Cells 60 Introduction 61 Methods 63 Results 69 Discussion 83 Chapter 4: Zika Virus Infects Human Placental Macrophages 109 Introduction 110 Methods 111 Results 117 Discussion 122 Chapter 5: Human Antibody Responses After Dengue Virus Infection are Highly Cross-Reactive to Zika Virus 134 Introduction 136 Methods 138 Results 141 Discussion 146 Chapter 6: Cross-reactive dengue virus antibodies augment Zika virus infection of human placental macrophages 158 Introduction 159 Methods 161 Results 169 Discussion 177 Chapter 7: Discussion 194 Summary of LGP2 study findings 195 Potential factors influencing disparate results 195 The conundrum of LGP2 function during WNV infection 200 LGP2 conclusion: RLR agonists as vaccine adjuvants 203 Summary of ZIKV study findings 204 Further advances in ZIKV tropism and immunology 205 Vertical transmission of other flaviviruses 209 Unanswered questions 212 ZIKV conclusion: A lingering threat 215 Concluding thoughts 216 Works Cited 218 List of Figures and Tables Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Figure 2-1: LGP2 negatively regulates RIG-I-mediated antiviral transcriptional responses in BM-DCs. 50 Figure 2-2: LGP2 negatively regulates downstream antiviral immune responses. 52 Figure 2-3: LGP2 is a negative regulator of RIG-I signaling in human cells and the CTD is not required for this function 53 Figure 2-4: LGP2 negatively regulates both IRF-3 and NF-κB promoter activities. 54 Figure 2-5: RNA binding and ATP hydrolysis are dispensable for negative regulation. 55 Figure 2-6: LGP2 associates with TRIM25 56 Figure 2-7: LGP2 interacts with RIG-I when co-expressed, but not at the endogenous level 57 Figure 2-8: LGP2 inhibits K63-ubiquitination of RIG-I. 58 Figure 2-9: Molecular mechanism of LGP2 negative regulation of RIG-I signaling 59 Chapter 3 Figure 3-1: Contemporary Puerto Rican ZIKV isolate productively infects human DCs. 91 Figure 3-2: ZIKV PR-2015 productively infects moDCs. 92 Figure 3-3: Differential infection of human DCs by evolutionarily distinct ZIKV strains 93 Figure 3-4: ZIKV strains have different replication characteristics. 95 Figure 3-5: ZIKV infection minimally activates human DCs. 96 Figure 3-6: ZIKV PR-2015 does not induce activation of DC subsets 97 Figure 3-7: ZIKV infection induces minimal pro-inflammatory cytokine production by DCs. ..........................................................................................................