Energy Market Opportunity Cost definition

Energy Market Opportunity Cost means the difference between (a) the forecasted cost to operate a specific generating unit when the unit only has a limited number of available run hours due to limitations imposed on the unit by Applicable Laws and Regulations, and (b) the forecasted future Locational Marginal Price at which the generating unit could run while not violating such limitations. Energy Market Opportunity Cost therefore is the value associated with a specific generating unit’s lost opportunity to produce energy during a higher valued period of time occurring within the same compliance period, which compliance period is determined by the applicable regulatory authority and is reflected in the rules set forth in PJM Manual 15. Energy Market Opportunity Costs shall be limited to those resources which are specifically delineated in Operating Agreement, Schedule 2. Energy Resource:
Energy Market Opportunity Cost means the difference between (a) the forecasted cost to operate a specific generating unit when the unit only has a limited number of available run hours due to limitations imposed on the unit by Applicable Laws and Regulations, and (b) the forecasted future Locational Marginal Price at which the generating unit could run while not violating such limitations. Energy Market Opportunity Cost therefore is the value associated with a specific generating unit’s lost opportunity to produce energy during a higher valued period of time occurring within the same compliance period, which compliance period is determined by the applicable regulatory authority and is reflected in the rules set forth in PJM Manual 15.
Energy Market Opportunity Cost means the difference between (a) the forecasted cost to operate a specific generating unit when the unit only has a limited number of available run hours due to limitations imposed on the unit by Applicable Laws and Regulations (as defined in PJM Tariff), and (b) the forecasted future hourly Locational Marginal Price at which the generating unit could run while not violating such limitations. Energy Market Opportunity Cost therefore is the value associated with a specific generating unit’s lost opportunity to produce energy during a higher valued period of time occurring within the same compliance period, which compliance period is determined by the applicable regulatory authority and is reflected in the rules set forth in PJM Manual 15. Energy Market Opportunity Costs shall be limited to those resources which are specifically delineated in Schedule 2 of the Operating Agreement.

Examples of Energy Market Opportunity Cost in a sentence

  • If the difference between the forecasted Locational Marginal Prices and forecasted costs to generate energy is negative, the resulting Energy Market Opportunity Cost shall be zero.

  • The introduction of this additional rental charge for standard modernisations will be delayed until the life cycle validation exercise is complete.

  • For the past two winters, ISO-NE has implemented its new Energy Market Opportunity Cost (EMOC) project.

  • If the difference between the forecasted Locational Marginal Prices and forecasted costs to generate energy is negative for any of the years, the average shall include the negative result and if the average difference over three years is negative, the resulting Energy Market Opportunity Cost shall be zero.

  • Report highlights included the following new projects: (i) 2019 FCM Improvements ($1.915 million); (ii) Update Security Application Framework Phase II ($993,000); (iv) Energy Storage Device Phase II ($966,000); and (v) Energy Market Opportunity Cost Phase II ($510,000).

  • Notwithstanding the foregoing, a Market Participant may submit a request to PJM for consideration and approval of an alternative method of calculating its Energy MarketPJM Interconnection, L.L.C. Fourth Revised Sheet No. 167 Third Revised Rate Schedule FERC No. 24 Superseding Second Revised Sheet No. 167 Opportunity Cost if the standard methodology described herein does not accurately represent the Market Participant’s Energy Market Opportunity Cost.

  • The provision included in the April 22nd Filing reads: Notwithstanding the foregoing, a Market Participant may submit a request to PJM for consideration and approval of an alternative method of calculating its Energy Market Opportunity Cost if the standard methodology described herein does not accurately represent the Market Participantʹs Energy Market Opportunity Cost.

  • The adder is not included with the cost-based offer automatically.• Market Sellers must also enter the Energy Market Opportunity Cost adder used in the “Opportunity” Field of the Schedules Details tab in Markets Gateway.A Special Session of the Market Implementation Committee is evaluating improvements and changes to the PJM and Monitoring Analytics opportunity cost calculators.

  • Notwithstanding the foregoing, a Market Participant may submit a request to PJM for consideration and approval of an alternative method of calculating its Energy Market Opportunity Cost if the standard methodology described herein does not accurately represent the Market Participant's Energy Market Opportunity Cost.

  • The Office of the Interconnection shall determine whether to accept or reject an offer including Energy Market Opportunity Cost subject to the criteria set forth in the Tariff and the PJM Manuals.


More Definitions of Energy Market Opportunity Cost

Energy Market Opportunity Cost means the difference between (a) the forecasted cost to operate a specific generating unit when the unit only has a limited number of available run hours due to limitations imposed on the unit by Applicable Laws and Regulations (as defined in PJM Tariff), and (b) the forecasted future hourly Locational Marginal Price at which the generating unit could run while not violating such limitations. Energy Market Opportunity Cost therefore is
Energy Market Opportunity Cost means the difference between (a) the forecasted cost to operate a specific generating unit when the unit only has a limited number of available run hours
Energy Market Opportunity Cost means the difference between (a) the forecasted cost to operate a specific generating unit when the unit only has a limited number of available run hours due to operational limitations imposed on the unit by Applicable Laws and Regulations (as defined in PJM Tariff)set forth in Schedule 2 of the Operating Agreement, and (b) the forecasted future hourly Locational Marginal Price at which the generating unit could run while not violating such limitations. Energy Market Opportunity Cost therefore is the value associated with a specific generating unit’s lost opportunity to produce energy during a higher valued period of time occurring within the same compliance period subject to a limited number of available run hours, which compliance period is determined by the applicable regulatory authority and is reflected in the rules set forth in PJM Manual 15. Energy Market Opportunity Costs shall be limited to those resources which are specifically delineated in Schedule 2 of the Operating Agreement.
Energy Market Opportunity Cost means the difference between (a) the forecasted cost to operate a specific generating unit when the unit only has a limited number of available run hours due to limitations imposed on the unit by Applicable Laws and Regulations (as defined in PJM

Related to Energy Market Opportunity Cost

  • Equal Employment Opportunity For any federally assisted construction contract, as defined in 41 CFR 60-1.3, the contractor, subcontractor, subrecipient shall follow all of the requirements of the Equal Opportunity Clause as stated in 41 CFR 60-1.4.

  • New Jersey Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMP) Manual or “BMP Manual” means the manual maintained by the Department providing, in part, design specifications, removal rates, calculation methods, and soil testing procedures approved by the Department as being capable of contributing to the achievement of the stormwater management standards specified in this chapter. The BMP Manual is periodically amended by the Department as necessary to provide design specifications on additional best management practices and new information on already included practices reflecting the best available current information regarding the particular practice and the Department’s determination as to the ability of that best management practice to contribute to compliance with the standards contained in this chapter. Alternative stormwater management measures, removal rates, or calculation methods may be utilized, subject to any limitations specified in this chapter, provided the design engineer demonstrates to the municipality, in accordance with Section IV.F. of this ordinance and N.J.A.C. 7:8-5.2(g), that the proposed measure and its design will contribute to achievement of the design and performance standards established by this chapter.

  • Day-ahead Energy Market means the schedule of commitments for the purchase or sale of energy and payment of Transmission Congestion Charges developed by the Office of the Interconnection as a result of the offers and specifications submitted in accordance with Operating Agreement, Schedule 1, section 1.10 and the parallel provisions of Tariff, Attachment K-Appendix.

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  • Public Finance Management Act ’ means the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (Act No. 1 of 1999);

  • Public Procurement means the acquisition by any means of goods, works or services by the government;

  • BMA means the Bermuda Monetary Authority.

  • Sustainability Coordinator means BofA Securities, Inc., in its capacity as the sustainability coordinator.

  • Electric public utility means a public utility, as that term is

  • Best Management Practices (BMPs means schedules of activities, prohibitions of practices, maintenance procedures, and other management practices to prevent or reduce the pollution of waters of the state. BMPs also include treatment requirements, operating procedures, and practices to control site runoff, spillage or leaks, sludge or waste disposal, or drainage from raw material storage.

  • Day-ahead System Energy Price means the System Energy Price resulting from the Day- ahead Energy Market.

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  • Local public procurement unit means any political subdivision or unit thereof which expends public funds for the procurement of supplies, services, or construction.

  • Moderate income housing means housing occupied or reserved for occupancy by households with a gross household income equal to or less than 80% of the median gross income for households of the same size in the county in which the city is located.

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  • Community rate means a rate of payment based on a per member per month capitation rate or its equivalent that applies to a combination of the subscriber groups for a comprehensive medical plan carrier. References in this subchapter to ‘‘a combination of cost and price analysis’’ relating to the ap- plicability of policy and contract clauses refer to comprehensive medical plan carriers using community rates.