Beef Sample Clauses

Beef. U.S. beef producers maintain access to a $1.8 billion market that accounted for nearly 22% of 2018 exports.
Beef. U.S. beef producers maintain access to a $1.8 billion market that accounted for nearly 22% of 2018 exports. Pork U.S. pork producers maintain access to two of their largest export markets, which combined totaled $2.1 billion (32% of total exports) in 2018. Poultry and Eggs Top U.S. Agricultural Exports to Canada and Mexico, 2018 1 Corn ($3.4 billion) 6 Fresh Vegetables ($2.0 billion) 2 Prepared Foods ($2.6 billion) 7 Soybeans ($2.0 billion) 3 Fresh Fruit ($2.1 billion) 8 Beef & Beef Products ($1.8 billion) 4 Pork & Pork Products ($2.1 billion) 9 Snack Foods ($1.7 billion) 5 Dairy Products ($2.0 billion) 10 Poultry & Eggs ($1.6 billion) U.S. poultry producers will have new access to Canada for chicken and eggs, and expanded access for turkey. Top U.S. Agricultural Exports to Canada and Mexico, 2018 1 Corn ($3.4 billion) 2 Prepared Foods ($2.7 billion) 3 Fresh Fruit ($2.2 billion) 5 Pork & Pork Products ($2.1 billion) 6 Dairy Products ($2.0 billion) 7 Fresh Vegetables ($2.0 billion) 8 Beef & Beef Products ($1.8 billion) 9 Snack Foods ($1.7 billion) 10 Poultry & Eggs ($1.6 billion)
Beef. U.S. beef producers maintain access to a $1.8 billion market that accounted for nearly 22% of 2018 exports. Dairy America’s dairy farmers will have new market opportunities in Canada for a wide variety of dairy products. Canada agrees to eliminate the Class 7 milk pricing program that allowed its farmers to undersell U.S. producers and will impose export surcharges on dairy products that exceed agreed thresholds. Top U.S. Agricultural Exports to Canada and Mexico, 2018 1 Corn ($3.4 billion) 2 Prepared Foods ($2.6 billion) 3 Fresh Fruit ($2.1 billion) 4 Pork & Pork Products ($2.1 billion) 5 Dairy Products ($2.0 billion) 6 Fresh Vegetables ($2.0 billion) 7 Soybeans ($2.0 billion) 8 Beef & Beef Products ($1.8 billion) 9 Snack Foods ($1.7 billion)
Beef. Nevada’s cattle industry leads all other agricultural industries in the state with more than $392.6 million in cash receipts in 2014. TPP passage is expected to increase beef cash receipts by $3.6 million per year, which is driven by a $3.3 million per year increase in direct exports to TPP countries.  Japan will eliminate 74 percent of duties on beef imports within 16 years. This includes reducing a tariff of 38.5 percent to 9 percent within 16 years on fresh, chilled, and frozen beef cut. The World Trade Organization safeguard will also be replaced by the TPP-wide safeguard, which is predicted to be less trade-limiting.  Japan’s beef offal tariffs as high as 21.3 percent will be eliminated in 6-16 years.  Malaysia’s tariffs on imports of beef will be eliminated.  Vietnam’s tariffs as high as 34 percent on beef, will be eliminated in 3-8 years.  New Zealand’s tariffs as high as 5 percent on beef, will be eliminated immediately. Dairy: Nevada’s dairy industry produced $170 million in cash receipts in 2014. TPP passage is expected to increase dairy cash receipts by $973.5 thousand per year, which is driven by a $463.8 thousand per year increase in direct exports to TPP countries.  Japan’s cheese tariffs as high as 40 percent, will be eliminated in 16 years.  Japan’s tariffs on whey will be eliminated, while establishing safeguards for whey powder, which will be terminated within 18 years. Whey protein concentrate will be terminated within 24 years.Whey for food tariffs, which currently face tariffs as high as 29.8 percent, will be eliminated in 21 years.  Malaysia’s dairy product tariffs as high as 5 percent, will be eliminated immediately.  Vietnam’s tariffs of 20 percent on cheese, milk powder, and whey will be eliminated immediately.  New Zealand’s and Brunie’s tariffs on dairy products will be eliminated immediately. Processed Food and Fish: In 2014, Nevada exported $92.5 million of processed foods to TPP countries. As of 2012, there were 4,108 employees in Nevada’s food manufacturing sector, with the largest percentage employed in the bakeries and tortilla manufacturing subsector.  Japan’s biscuits, cookies, crackers, and other bread products tariffs, as high as 26 percent, will be eliminated in 6 years.  Japan’s uncooked spaghetti and macaroni tariffs will be reduced 60 percent in 9 years.  Malaysia’s processed products tariffs as high as 25 percent will be eliminated in 16 years.  Vietnam’s cookies, crackers, biscuits, breads, and starc...
Beef. On December 12, 2005, Japan partially reopened its market to U.S. beef after a nearly two-year ban resulting from the December 2003 discovery of a single imported cow with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in Washington State. Japan suspended imports of U.S. beef again on January 20, 2006, after a shipment of U.S. veal was rejected for containing a vertebral column (which is not allowed under Japanese regulations). On July 27, 2006, Japan lifted the January suspension after intensive engagement among officials and technical experts from both governments at various levels. The full reopening of the Japanese market remains a top priority of the Administration. With the most recent reopening, the United States is able – under a special marketing programto export beef to Japan from cattle 20 months of age and younger. However, only a small percentage of the cattle slaughtered in the United States qualify for export under this program. It is estimated that U.S. beef exports to Japan over 2006 will be worth nearly $50 million. Prior to the ban, U.S. beef and beef product exports to the Japanese market (the largest export market for U.S. beef) totaled roughly $1.3 billion annually. The United States continues to place a high priority on fully opening Japan’s market to U.S. beef, and continues to urge Japan to implement the BSE guidelines of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), thereby allowing imports of cattle of any age as well as meat and meat products from those animals. The United States will continue to work toward achieving this important objective. Other Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) Measures: Japan's use of sanitary and phytosanitary measures continues to create barriers to certain U.S. agricultural goods, such as in the areas of Maximum Residue Limits (MRL) and chipping potatoes. On May 29, 2006, Japan implemented new regulatory requirements expanding MRL standards (Positive List) for food that may contain pesticide residues. Although the United States has worked closely with the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare (MHLW) to ensure the transition to the Positive List system does not unnecessarily disrupt U.S. exports, there remain outstanding issues with Japan's MRL policies, including the seemingly arbitrary and trade restrictive manner in which MHLW imposes penalties on foreign suppliers in the event of a violation. Import violations are treated more strictly than domestic violations. Detection of a single MRL violation in an...
Beef. Hong Kong banned imports of U.S. beef in December 2003 following a reported case of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE). After two years of intensive efforts on the part of the U.S. Government, the Hong Kong government announced the partial reopening of its market to deboned beef from animals of 30 months of age or less, with certain restrictions, in December 2005. These excessive restrictions, however, have discouraged most qualified U.S. beef exporters from shipping to Hong Kong. It is estimated that the two-year ban (2004-2005) cost U.S. exporters approximately $160 million. World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) guidelines provide for scientifically-based conditions under which all beef and beef products from animals of any age can be safely traded from “controlled risk countries”. In May 2007, the OIE classified the United States as controlled risk for BSE. The United States continues to press Hong Kong to normalize trade and implement import requirements for U.S. beef and beef products on the basis of the OIE guidelines and the U.S. controlled risk classification.
Beef. Australia currently has access to a tariff rate quota under the WTO agreements for 378,214 tonnes of beef. The tariff paid on that quantity of beef is US4.4c/kg, compared to a 26.4% tariff on beef exports to the United States in excess of 378,214 tonnes. Paragraph 2 of Annex I to the Tariff Schedule of the United States provides that the US4.4c/kg in-quota beef tariff will be eliminated immediately once the Agreement enters into force. Under Paragraph 3 of Annex I, Australia will receive additional duty free access for an increasing volume of beef in subsequent years of the Agreement. The additional quota volumes will grow from 20,000 tonnes in year 3 of the Agreement (at the latest) to 70,000 tonnes in year 18 of the Agreement. Meanwhile, from years 9-18 the 26.4% tariff on over-quota exports will be reduced to zero. Beginning in year 18, Australia will be free to export an unlimited amount of beef to the United States, subject to a beef safeguard (see below).
Beef. 2. (a) The aggregate quantity of goods entered under the provisions listed in subparagraph (c) shall be free of duty in any calendar year specified herein, and shall not exceed the quantity specified below for each such year: Year Quantity (Kilograms) 1 15,000 16,500 3 18,150 4 19,965 5 21,962 6 24,158 7 26,573 8 29,231 9 32,154 10
Beef. “The meat comes from animals that received antemortem and postmortem inspection at the time of xxxxxxxxx and was determined to be wholesome and free of disease. It contains no unauthorized preservatives or other additives or food colorings. It contains no harmful residues of antibiotics, coccidiostatic substances, hormones, pesticides, radioactive elements, or medications according to the national residue program. It has been prepared in an establishment that is inspected by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service and is suitable for human consumption.”
Beef. Beef and Veal shall be USDA Choice or better, except for meat used in extended dishes, and ground beef, which can be USDA Select. Veal steaks shall be solid meat portions – not pre‐formed from chopped or ground meat. Ground beef shall not exceed 20% fat content. All Beef served shall be inspected and passed for wholesomeness by official inspectors of the USDA.