Factors Beyond the HSP’s Control definition

Factors Beyond the HSP’s Control include occurrences that are, in whole or in part, caused by persons, entities or events beyond the HSP’s control. Examples may include, but are not limited to, the following:
Factors Beyond the HSP’s Control include occurrences that are, in whole or in LONG-TERM CARE HOME SERVICE ACCOUNTABILITY AGREEMENT APRIL 1, 2019 — MARCH 31, 2022 part, caused by persons, entities or events beyond the HSP’s control. Examples may include, but are not limited to, the following:
Factors Beyond the HSP’s Control incIude occurrenceç that are, in whoIe or in part, cauçed by perçonç, entitieç or eventç beyond the HSP’ç controI. ExampIeç may incIude, but are not Iimited to, the foIIowing:

More Definitions of Factors Beyond the HSP’s Control

Factors Beyond the HSP’s Control include occurrences that are, in whole or in part, caused by persons, entities or events beyond the HSP’s control. Examples may include, but are not limited to, the following: significant costs associated with complying with new or amended Government of Ontario technical standards, guidelines, policies or legislation; the availability of health care in the community (hospital care, long-term care, home care, and primary care); the availability of health human resources; arbitration decisions that affect HSP employee compensation packages, including wage, benefit and pension compensation, which exceed reasonable HSP planned compensation settlement increases and in certain cases non-monetary arbitration awards that significantly impact upon HSP operational flexibility; and catastrophic events, such as natural disasters and infectious disease outbreaks;

Related to Factors Beyond the HSP’s Control

  • Completion Date means the date of completion of the Services by the Service Provider as certified by the Procuring Entity

  • These courses also satisfy an MTA area: Natural Science: BIO 138 (non-lab); Humanities: ART 224, 225, 226, 227; ENG 243, 248; PHIL 201; WR 233, 236, 241; Social Science: ANTH 131, 151, 152, 154; EDU 296; GEOG 132; HIST 113, 261; POLS 152; SOC 152, 251.This course applies, but does not satisfy the MTA: ART 229, BBA 250; LGL 248; PLGL 248 HFC Pre-Engineering: Electrical/Computer Program Requirements (31 credits) ENGR 125 Introduction to Computation for Engineering ... 3 CEET 151 Intro Computing in Engineering Tech 3 * ENGR 130 Introduction to Engineering.............................. 3 ME 100 General Transfer Credit sub for EECE 100 3 1*ENGR 240 Circuits ............................................................ 5 EECE 212 Engineering Circuit Analysis (3)+2 5 1*MATH 183 Calculus II........................................................ 5 MATH 121 Calculus II (4)+1 5 * MATH 280 Calculus III....................................................... 5 MATH 223 Multivariable Calculus (4)+1 5 * MATH 288 Differential Equations ...................................... 5 MATH 325 Differential Equations (3)+2 5 * PHYS 232 Engineering Physics II ..................................... 5 PHYS 224 Electricity and Light 5 EMU Requirements and Electives that may be taken at HFC or EMU (14 credits) * CIS 170 C Programming ............................................... 3 COSC 000 General Transfer Credit sub for COSC 111 3 * ENGR 205 Digital Systems................................................ 4 EECE 000 General Trans Credit sub for EECE 251 (3)+1 . 4 * MATH 275 Discrete Mathematics ...................................... 4 MATH 205 General Trans Credit sub for EECE 262 (3)+1 . 4 * MATH 283 Linear Algebra ................................................. 3 MATH 122 Elementary Linear Algebra 3 Credits at HFC: ........................................................78 Credits that apply to EMU’s program 78 * Required for the Electrical and Computer Engineering program at EMU. Must be taken at EMU if not completed prior to transferring.

  • Best Management Practices (BMPs means schedules of activities, prohibitions of practices, maintenance procedures, and other management practices to prevent or reduce the pollution of waters of the state. BMPs also include treatment requirements, operating procedures, and practices to control site runoff, spillage or leaks, sludge or waste disposal, or drainage from raw material storage.