Penetration Testing definition

Penetration Testing means security testing in which assessors mimic real-world attacks to identify methods for circumventing the security features of an application, system, or network. (NIST SP 800-115)
Penetration Testing means a test methodology in which assessors attempt to circumvent or defeat the security features of an Information System by attempting penetration of databases or controls from outside or inside the Covered Entity’s Information Systems.
Penetration Testing means a test methodology in which assessors attempt to circumvent or defeat the security features of an Information System.

Examples of Penetration Testing in a sentence

  • By the year 2000 large incumbent firms, like IBM and HP, are just new entrants and insignificant players in this industry, which also legitimates our focus on startups.[TABLE 1 ABOUT HERE] To date, SSI includes a wide range of products: from the basic security software, such as Virtual Private Networks, Firewall and Virus Scanning to advanced security services like Public Key Infrastructures, Security Certification and Penetration Testing.

  • Typically, this begins with a balance ofVulnerability Management, Penetration Testing andRed Team Operations.

  • Cybersecurity Defense2-1Asset Management2-2Identity and Access Management 2-3Information Systems and Information Processing Facilities Protection 2-4 Email Protection2-5Network Security Management2-6Mobile Devices Security2-7Data and Information Protection2-8Cryptography2-9Backup and Recovery Management2-10Vulnerability Management 2-11 Penetration Testing 2-12Cybersecurity Event Logs and Monitoring Management2-13Cybersecurity Incident and Threat Management2-14Physical Security2-15Web Application Security3.


More Definitions of Penetration Testing

Penetration Testing means an assessment to identify risks and vulnerabilities in systems, applications and networks which may compromise the confidentiality, integrity or availability of information held on that IT system. “Need-to-Know” the Need-to-Know principle is employed within HMG to limit the distribution of classified information to those people with a clearneed to knowin order to carry out their duties.
Penetration Testing means the testing of IT systems and IT services to identify potential security vulnerabilities, and subsequently recommending effective security countermeasures;
Penetration Testing means the practice of testing the Hosted Programs or Third Party Services and any related networks or web applications to find vulnerabilities that an attacker could exploit.
Penetration Testing means a simulated attack on an internet-connected IT system which is performed to evaluate the security of the IT system.
Penetration Testing means security testing in which assessors mimic real-world attacks to identify methods for circumventing the security features of an application, system, or network. “Third Party Assessment Organizations” means an organization independent of the organization whose IT system is being assessed. They are required to meet the ISO/IEC 17020:1998 standards for independence and managerial competence and meet program requirements for technical FISMA competence through demonstrated expertise in assessing cloud-based solutions. “Personally Identifiable Information (PII)” means information that can be used to distinguish or trace an individual's identity, such as their name, Social Security Number (SSN), biometric records, etc., alone, or when combined with other personal or identifying information which is linked or linkable to a specific individual, such as date and place of birth, mother’s maiden name, etc. The definition of PII is not anchored to any single category of information or technology. Rather, it requires a case-by-case assessment of the specific risk that an individual can be identified. In performing this assessment, it is important to recognize that non-PII can become PII whenever additional information is made publicly available — in any medium and from any source — that, when combined with other available information, could be used to identify an individual. PII examples include name, address, SSN, or other identifying number or code, telephone number, and e-mail address. PII can also consist of a combination of indirect data elements such as gender, race, birth date, geographic indicator (e.g., zip code), and other descriptors used to identify specific individuals. When defining PII for USAID purposes, the term “individual” refers to a citizen of the United States or an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence.
Penetration Testing. 1 means a test methodology in which assessors, using all available documentation such as system design, source code, manuals and working under specific constraints, attempt to circumvent the security features of an IT system;