Come definition

Come means…. (a) derive (b) start (c) arrive (d) go
Come bet means a wager placed at any time after the come out roll which shall:
Come said Mr. Utterson, "that is not fitting language."

Examples of Come in a sentence

Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.

Marc Galanter, Why the “Haves” Come Out Ahead: Speculations on the Limits of Legal Change, 9 LAW & SOC’Y REV.

Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.

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More Definitions of Come

Come mean ‘–’ and ‘will’ means ‘+’ then what will be the value of
Come means How?
Come. ” This term means either “come” or “go forth.” The text of the ancient Greek uncial manuscript Sinaiticus (!) adds “and see” (cf. KJV), but Alexandrinus (A) has only “come.” In context this command (PRESENT IMPERATIVE) does not refer to John or the church, but to the four horsemen (cf. 6:3,5,7).
Come. " This term means either "come" or "go forth." The text of the ancient Greek uncial manuscript Sinaiticus (א) adds "and see" (cf. KJV, NKJV, which wold refer to John), but Alexandrinus (A) has only "come" (which would refer to the four horses). UBS4 gives this shorter form a "B" rating (almost certain). In context this command (present imperative) does not refer to John or the church, but to the four horsemen (cf. Rev. 6:3,5,7).
Come means to "arrive at" or "attain" in the sense of reaching a goal (Acts 26:7; Phil. 3:11). Obviously, "all" speaks of Christians and not a confluence of nations. "Faith" has to do with trust or confidence while "knowledge" refers to full experimental knowledge. Both faith and knowledge relate to the "Son of God." He is at one with the Father in glory, attributes and honor.
Come said the lawyer, "I see you have some good reason, Poole; I see
Come. I said, standing up; “let’s go towards the sunset, dear, and talk about it all. Do you know-this is a most beautiful world, an amazingly beautiful world, and when the sunset falls upon you it makes you into shining gold. No, not gold-into golden glass. Into something better that either glass or