Licensed IP definition

Licensed IP means the Licensed Patents and the Licensed Know-How.
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Licensed IP means the Licensed Patent Rights and the Licensed Know-How.
Licensed IP means (a) all Intellectual Property Rights and Intellectual Property incorporated into, or used in the development, delivery, hosting or distribution of, the Company Products; and (b) all other Intellectual Property Rights and Intellectual Property used or held for use in the conduct of the business of the Company, as currently conducted and as currently proposed to be conducted by the Company, in the case of each of (a) or (b), that are not owned by, or purported to be owned by, the Company, and instead have been licensed to the Company (whether or not currently exercisable) or pursuant to which the Company has been granted any covenant not to sue or consent with respect to any Intellectual Property or Intellectual Property Rights that are not owned by the Company.

Examples of Licensed IP in a sentence

No settlement, judgment or other disposition (collectively, “Disposition”) of a suit regarding the Licensed IP being prosecuted by A&B within the Territory may be entered into without the consent NHC if such Disposition would alter, derogate or diminish such other party’s rights under this Agreement or would invalidate or restrict NHC’s Intellectual Property Rights in any respect, whether within or outside of the Territory.

As of the Effective Date, NHC hereby grants to A&B an exclusive, perpetual, irrevocable, paid-up and royalty-free license with the right to sub-license, subject to the terms and restrictions under this Agreement, to use the Licensed IP only for the purpose of the commercializing the PoNS Devices, Components and Services within the Territory and manufacturing the PoNS Devices solely for Territory, and A&B hereby accepts such right and license.


More Definitions of Licensed IP

Licensed IP means the Intellectual Property owned by any person other than the Corporation and the Subsidiary and which the Corporation and/or the Subsidiary uses;
Licensed IP means (i) with respect to the licenses granted to MatCo or the MatCo Licensees, as applicable, hereunder, the AgCo Licensed IP, the Intellectual Property licensed under Sections 2.3(b) and 2.4 hereof, the Patents Controlled by AgCo or any of its Affiliates and licensed under Section 2.6 hereof, and the Business Software Controlled by AgCo or any of its Affiliates, and (ii) with respect to the licenses granted to AgCo or the AgCo Licensees, as applicable, hereunder, the MatCo Licensed IP, the Intellectual Property licensed under Section 2.3(a) hereof, the Patents Controlled by MatCo or any of its Affiliates and licensed under Section 2.6 hereof, and the Business Software Controlled by MatCo or any of its Affiliates.
Licensed IP means, with respect to a Licensor, such Licensor’s Licensed Know-How and Licensed Patent Rights.
Licensed IP means, collectively, the Licensed Know-How and Licensed Patent Rights.
Licensed IP means all (a) Patents, Materials and Know-How Controlled at any time during the term of this License Agreement by Bluebird or any of its Affiliates (including any applicable Collaboration IP and Bluebird Technology), other than pursuant to an Applicable Bluebird In-License, and (b) Bluebird In-Licensed IP, in each case to the extent necessary or useful to Develop Elected Candidate and Develop and Commercialize Licensed Product. [***].
Licensed IP means the (a) Licensed Patents; and (b) Licensed Know-how.
Licensed IP means Company Intellectual Property that is licensed to the Company or any of its Subsidiaries, excluding (i) off-the-shelf software and software that is generally available for license on a mass market commercial basis pursuant to a standard form agreement that is not subject to negotiation for annual fees that do not exceed $20,000, and (ii) other software that is not material to the conduct of the business of the Company or any of its Subsidiaries and can be readily replaced for $100,000 or less with software that provides substantially the same features, functionalities and overall performance.