Achievements Sample Clauses

Achievements. 2.1. How has your Cooperating Partnership helped to make DARIAH better known in your institution and beyond? Please explain.
Achievements. If the Debt Service Coverage Ratio, for any calendar quarter is not at least 1.4 to 1.0, or if the Lease Debt Service Coverage Ratio, for any calendar quarter is not at least 1.1 to 1.00, then, provided that either the Senior Loan has been paid in full or Senior Lender has waived or not exercised its right pursuant to Section 9.3 of the Senior Loan Agreement to retain such Excess Cash Flow in the Senior Loan Cash Management Account, Lender may deliver written notice to the Senior Cash Management Bank instructing the Senior Cash Management Bank to deposit Excess Cash Flow in the Cash Management Account to be held by Lender (provided that if Senior Lender subsequently revokes a previous waiver of its right to retain Excess Cash Flow or subsequently exercises its right to retain Excess Cash Flow, then Lender’s foregoing right will cease and such escrowed funds will be returned to Borrower). Any such funds escrowed shall be returned to Borrower if the Debt Service Coverage Ratio, as thereafter calculated in any two (2) consecutive months equals or exceeds 1.4 to 1.0 and if the Lease Debt Service Coverage Ratio, as calculated for such two (2) consecutive months equals or exceeds 1.1 to 1.00, and Lender shall not thereafter retain Excess Cash Flow unless and until Lender may thereafter be entitled again to retain them pursuant to the first sentence of this Section. Such period in which Lender is entitled to retain Excess Cash Flow shall be referred to as a “Cash Trap Period.” All such deposit amounts shall be treated as a “Reserve Fund” for purposes of Section 7.7 hereof. All additional amounts retained or deposited under this section shall be additional security for the repayment of the Debt and may be withdrawn by Lender upon the occurrence of an Event of Default and applied by Lender in such order and priority as Lender may determine. All calculations of Debt Service Coverage Ratio and Lease Debt Service Coverage Ratio shall be subject to verification by Lender.
Achievements. These are results/objectives attained by an SME or other client, in which its competitiveness and innovative capacities have been improved through services provided in WP1. Examples could be financing obtained, patents applied for, tenders in other countries successfully applied for, etc. Note that the number of Achievements indicates the combined total for the two activities producing Achievements (WP1 – Advice, support and information activities and WP2Cross-border partnering activities for business cooperation, technology transfer, innovation and research).
Achievements. Borrower shall achieve, and within forty-five (45) days after the end of each calendar quarter (the "DSCR Determination Date") provide evidence to Lender of the achievement of, a Debt Service Coverage Ratio for the Property. If on any DSCR Determination Date the Debt Service Coverage Ratio is not at least 1.28 to 1.0 (the "Default Determination Ratio"), then Borrower shall deposit all Excess Cash Flow in the Cash Management Account. Any such funds escrowed shall be returned to Borrower if the Default Determination Ratio is achieved for two consecutive DSCR Determination Dates. No Event of Default shall occur by reason of this Section 9.3 so long as Borrower deposits into the Cash Management Account the additional amounts required by this Section. All such deposit amounts shall be treated as a "Reserve Fund" for purposes of Section 7.7 hereof. All additional amounts deposited under this Section shall be additional security for the repayment of the Debt and may be withdrawn by Lender upon the occurrence of an Event of Default and applied by Lender in such order and priority as Lender may determine. All calculations of Debt Service Coverage Ratio shall be subject to verification by Lender.
Achievements. When applying awards for scientific achievements, both Party A and Party B will be created with Party A receiving the major create on such mutually agreed achievements.
Achievements. The two distributors succeeded in selling 1,000 units of SHS each, mostly in plantation areas, where farmers receive a regular and decent income. However, the program lasted only for one year, as BRI’s operation did not manage to be profitable. Collection costs in rural areas are high, and only 10-20% of the population in a village would be eligible for the credit program. The market density was too low to allow a fully commercial scheme to reach economies of scale and be sustainable. Main weaknesses: ▪ No financial sustainability: The low market density makes a sustainable business model covering all operating and marketing costs very difficult. A fully commercial credit scheme does not seem adapted to low income populations. ▪ Competition between government and private initiatives: The free SHS approach of the government directly affected the commercial market for SHS. In areas where the government SHS program was also present, BRI’s clients did not want to pay their instalments (monthly loan reimbursement) as they would see neighbours getting their SHS for free. Today, it is essential to acknowledge the various lessons learned from these experiences and to build on them in order to design more effective, better adapted financial models.
Achievements. The following provides a brief overview of the main research that have been covered in a collaboratively manner by the seven research groups of Annex 15 over the past 5 years (June 1999 – July 2004). These efforts have not only been building on but did progress beyond the achievements of the previous Annex 10 (1995 – 1998) in a most significant manner. General progress within Annex 15 The most important general of Annex 15 activity was held 2002 as the International conference BioHydrogen 2002. The aims of Biohydrogen 2002 were to summarise the state-of-the-art of biological hydrogen production, evaluate current progress on early-stage applied science in this area of research and development, and to identify promising research directions for the future. Biohydrogen 2002 coincided with the end of the first 3 years of Annex 15 of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement. This most successful international conference, held under auspices of IEA Hydrogen Implementing Agreement Annex 15 Photobiological Hydrogen Production, and EU COST 8.41 Biological and Biochemical Diversity of Hydrogen Metabolism in Ede, the Netherlands, April 21- 24, 2002, attracted about 150 scientists. In addition to a final announcement leaflet and a book of abstracts/program the financial contribution from the Hydrogen agreement and the countries participating in Annex 15 made it possible to publish the Proceedings (45 double refereed papers) as a Hardbound book of a Special Issue (2002, volume 27, # 11/12, November/December) of the International Journal of Hydrogen Energy (IJHE), see Figure 1. All participants of BioHydrogen 2002 received a complementary hardbound copy of these proceedings. As a consequence, the scientific advancements within Annex 15 was not only presented and discussed within the smaller group but also spread to a much larger audiance. Figure 1. Editorial, Biohydrogen 2002 International Journal of Hydrogen Energy (2002) 27: 1123-1124 During 2000 the scientific content of Annex 15 was presented and discussed at international conferences. The purpose of these presentations was to announce Annex 15, and its scientific content, to a larger audiance. - 10th Canadian Hydrogen Conference (Quebec; May 2000). Lindblad, P., Asada, Y., Benemann, J., Hallenbeck, P., Melis, A., Miyake, J., Seibert, M. and Skulberg, O. 2000. IEA Hydrogen Agreement, Task 15: Photobiological Hydrogen Production - An International Collaboration. Proceedings 10th Canadian Hydrogen Conference. Pages: 731-733. Editors...
Achievements. 1. New Life member is eligible to become a fellow in the same year of convocation conducted by IMA AMS H.Qrs.