Wetlands definition

Wetlands or “wetland” means an area that is inundated or saturated by surface water or ground water at a frequency and duration sufficient to support, and that under normal circumstances does support, a prevalence of vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions, commonly known as hydrophytic vegetation.
Wetlands means those areas that are inundated or saturated by surface or groundwater at a frequency and duration sufficient to support a prevalence of vegetation typically adapted to life in saturated soil conditions. Wetlands include, but are not limited to, swamps, marshes, bogs, and similar areas.
Wetlands means an area where water is at, near or above the land surface long enough to be capable of supporting aquatic or hydrophytic vegetation and which has soils indicative of wet conditions.

Examples of Wetlands in a sentence

  • The LCWA has taken the time to share designs in public meetings and in one-on-one stakeholder meetings to answer questions and address concerns throughout the conceptual restoration design development from 2012-2015, the Program environmental impact report from 2017 – 2020, the refined habitat restoration plan from 2020 – 2021, and now the Southern Los Cerritos Wetlands Restoration Plan.

  • If Rockfish proceeds with the current design of the Project, they would need to apply for a Nontidal Wetlands Permit through MDE.

  • This effort will help to mitigate the effects of erosion and surface runoff on these features.The applicant should be advised that a portion of the retained lands and Severance #3 are regulated by MVCA pursuant to Ontario Regulation 153/06 - “Development, Interference with Wetlands and Alterations to Shorelines and Watercourses”.

  • Depending on the final assessment of wetland impacts, a CDOT Functional Assessment of Colorado Wetlands (FACWet) may be required.

  • Under the Ontario Regulation 174/06— Development, Interference with Wetlands and Alterations to Shorelines and Watercourses Regulation, the approval of the Conservation Authority is required for works such as site grading, the placement of fill, the alteration of existing channels of watercourses, and certain construction projects.


More Definitions of Wetlands

Wetlands means areas that are inundated or saturated by surface water or groundwater at a frequency and duration sufficient to support, and that under normal circumstances do support, a prevalence of vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions. Wetlands generally include swamps, marshes, bogs, and similar areas. Wetlands do not include those artificial wetlands intentionally created from nonwetland sites, including, but not limited to, irrigation and drainage ditches, grass-lined swales, canals, detention facilities, wastewater treatment facilities, farm ponds, and landscape amenities, or those wetlands created after July 1, 1990, that were unintentionally created as a result of the construction of a road, street, or highway. Wetlands may include those artificial wetlands intentionally created from nonwetland areas to mitigate the conversion of wetlands.
Wetlands means those areas that are inundated or saturated by surface or groundwater at a
Wetlands means land, including submerged land as defined in this section, not regulated pursuant to sections 22a-28 through 22a-35, inclusive, of the Connecticut General Statutes, which consists of any of the soil types designated as poorly drained, very poorly drained, alluvial, and floodplain by the National Cooperative Soils Survey, as may be amended from time to time, of the Natural Resources Conservation Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Such areas may include filled, graded, or excavated sites which possess an aquic (saturated) soil moisture regime as defined by the USDA Cooperative Soil Survey.
Wetlands means those areas that are inundated or saturated by surface water or ground water at a frequency and a duration sufficient to support, and under normal circumstances do support, a prevalence of vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soils. Soils present in wetlands generally are classified as hydric or alluvial, or possess characteristics that are associated with reducing soil conditions. The prevalent vegetation in wetlands generally consists of facultative or obligate hydrophytic macrophytes that are typically adapted to areas having soil conditions described above. These species, due to morphological, physiological, or reproductive adaptations, have the ability to grow, reproduce or persist in aquatic environments or anaerobic soil conditions. Florida wetlands generally include swamps, marshes, bayheads, bogs, cypress domes and strands, sloughs, wet prairies, riverine swamps and marshes, hydric seepage slopes, tidal marshes, mangrove swamps and other similar areas. Florida wetlands generally do not include longleaf or slash pine flatwoods with an understory dominated by saw palmetto. [Section 373.019(27), F.S.] The landward extent of wetlands is delineated pursuant to Rules 62-340.100 through 62-340.550, F.A.C., as ratified by Section 373.4211, F.S.
Wetlands means land, which consists of any of the soil types designated as poorly drained, very poorly drained, alluvial, and floodplain by the National Cooperative Soils Survey, as may be amended from time to time, of the Natural Resources Conservation Service of the United States Department of Agriculture;
Wetlands means lands transitional between terrestrial and aquatic systems where the water table is usually at or near the surface or the land is covered by shallow water. For purposes of this definition, wetlands must have the following three attributes:
Wetlands means those areas that are inundated or saturated by surface or ground