Data Protection Legislation definition

Data Protection Legislation means the Data Protection Act 1998, the EU Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC, the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, the Telecommunications (Lawful Business Practice) (Interception of Communications) Regulations 2000 (SI 2000/2699), the Electronic Communications Data Protection Directive 2002/58/EC, the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 and all applicable laws and regulations relating to processing of personal data and privacy, including where applicable the guidance and codes of practice issued by the Information Commissioner;

Examples of Data Protection Legislation in a sentence

  • Both parties will comply with all applicable requirements of the Data Protection Legislation.

  • We are required under Data Protection Legislation to notify you of the information contained in this Privacy Notice.

  • You will ensure that any Personal Data that is transferred to Airwallex is transferred by a method and means that is secure and compliant with Data Protection Legislation in addition to any other reasonable information security requirements specified by us.

  • Each paky warrants to the other that it is and will continue to be appropriately notified under the terms of any applicable Data Protection Legislation and any other relevant data protection laws, legislation and regulation.

  • Both pakies will comply with all applicable requirements of the Data Protection Legislation.


More Definitions of Data Protection Legislation

Data Protection Legislation means (i) the GDPR, the LED and any applicable national implementing Laws as amended from time to time (ii) the DPA 2018 to the extent that it relates to processing of personal data and privacy; and (iii) all applicable Law about the processing of personal data and privacy.
Data Protection Legislation means (i) unless and until the GDPR is no longer directly applicable in the UK, the General Data Protection Regulation ((EU) 2016/679) and any national implementing laws, regulations and secondary legislation, as amended or updated from time to time, in the UK and then (ii) any successor legislation to the GDPR or the Data Protection Act 1998.
Data Protection Legislation means all applicable laws and regulations, as amended or updated from time to time, in the United Kingdom relating to data protection, the processing of personal data and privacy, including without limitation,(a) the Data Protection Act 1998; (b) (with effect from 25 May 2018) the General Data Protection Regulation (EU) 2016/679; (c) the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 (as may be amended by the proposed Regulation on Privacy and Electronic Communications); and (d) any legislation that replaces or converts into United Kingdom law the General Data Protection Regulation (EU) 2016/679, the proposed Regulation on Privacy and Electronic Communications or any other law relating to data protection, the processing of personal data and privacy resulting from the United Kingdom leaving the European Union;
Data Protection Legislation means the Data Protection Act 2018, THE LED, the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, the Telecommunications (Lawful Business Practice) (Interception of Communications) Regulations 2000 (SI 2000/2699), the Privacy and Electronic Communications Directive 2002/58/EC, the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) (Amendment) Regulations 2011 and all applicable laws, regulations, statute, declaration, decree, directive, legislative enactment, order, ordinance, regulation, rule or other binding restriction (as amended, consolidated or re-enacted from time to time) relating to the protection of individuals with regards to the processing of personal data and privacy to which a party is subject, including the GDPR on and from 25 May 2018, the date upon which the GDPR applies (as set out in Article 99 (Entry into force and application) of the GDPR) and including where applicable the guidance and codes of practice issued by the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office and any generally accepted code of good practice;