Archaeological definition

Archaeological means having to do with the scientific study of material remains of past human
Archaeological means relating to the field of archaeology, the scientific study of cultures through the examination of their material remains such as buildings, graves, tools, and other artefacts.
Archaeological risk 6.3 X This is a particularly sensitive issue in Irish projects. Depending on the nature of the site and project, it may be appropriate to include this in the list of Relief Events. Alternatively, a 2 October 2007 No. RISK CLAUSE PRIVATE SECTOR PUBLIC SECTOR SHARED COMMENT risk sharing approach to cost could be used. The standard Project Agreement includes Archaeological Discoveries in the list of Relief Events and offers a cost sharing option. However, the public sector should always consider on a case-by-case basis, whether it would be better value for money to bear this risk itself.

Examples of Archaeological in a sentence

Will assist the awarding agency in assuring compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended (16 U.S.C. §470), EO 11593 (identification and protection of historic properties), and the Archaeological and Historic Preservation Act of 1974 (16 U.S.C. §§469a-1 et seq.).

Archaeological Resources – Any material remains of past human life or activities which are of archaeological interest, such as tools, structures or portions of structures, pit houses, rock paintings, rock carvings, intaglios, graves, human skeletal materials, or any portion or piece of any of the foregoing items.

Will assist the awarding agency in assuring compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended (16 U.S.C. §470), EO 11593 (identification and protection of historic properties), and the Archaeological and Historic Preservation Act of 1974 (16 U.S.C. §§469a-1 et seq.).14.

Will assist the awarding agency in assuring compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended (16 U.S.C. 470), EO 11593 (identification and protection of historic properties), and the Archaeological and Historic Preservation Act of 1974 (16 U.S.C. 469a-1 et seq.).

Will assist the awarding agency in assuring compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended (16 U.S.C. §470), EO 11593 (identification and protection of historic properties), and the Archaeological and Historic Preservation Act of 1974 (16 U.S.C. §§469a-1 et seq).

Archaeological or Historical Resource - those sites, buildings, structures, and artifacts, which possess material evidence of human life and culture of prehistoric and historic past.

Archaeological resources shall be protected and preserved in place.

Will assist the awarding agency in assuring compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended (16 U.S.C. §470), EO 11593 (identification and protection of historic properties), and the Archaeological and Historic Preservation Act of 1974 (16 U.S.C. §§ 469a-1 et seq.).

Whenever, in the course of construction, any archaeological evidence is encountered on the surface or below the surface of the ground, the Contractor shall notify the authorities of the Delaware Archaeological Board and suspend work in the immediate area for a reasonable time to permit those authorities, or persons designated by them, to examine the area and ensure the proper removal of the archaeological evidence for suitable preservation in the State Museum.

Will assist the awarding agency in assuring compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended (16 U.S.C.470), EO 11593 (identification and protection of historic properties), and the Archaeological and Historic Preservation Act of 1974 (16 U.S.C. 469a-1 et seq.).


More Definitions of Archaeological

Archaeological means having to do with the scientific study of material remains of past human life and activities. “Archaeological site” means an area of ancestral human use such as middens, burial grounds, and earthworks.
Archaeological means the systematic recovery and study of material evidence, such as buildings, tools, and pottery, remaining from past human life and culture.
Archaeological means all sites, deposits, structures, or objects which are at least 100 years of age and which provide information pertaining to the historical or prehistorical culture of people. Artifacts: are portable items made, used, or transported by humans.
Archaeological works like The Order of Things.31 The fact that Foucault’s answer centered on Kant’s essay An Answer to the Question: What is Enlightenment? (1784) was all the more perplexing. If Kant’s “critical” philosophy marksthreshold of our modernity,” and if that modernity leads to the “analytic of finitude” and the “anthropological sleep” of the human sciences, then one would expect Foucault to find in Kant’s essay a confirmation of the complicity of the enlightenment in the attempt to subject “man” to special forms of observation and correction. Instead, Foucault finds evidence of an alternative modernity in Kant’s essay, a modernity shaped by the “critical” attitude of the enlightenment. Foucault returned to Kant’s essay on enlightenment again and again in the late 1970's and early 1980's. In one of his lectures, Foucault told his audience that the text had become for him “a small coat of arms, a small fetish” (un peu blason, un peu fétice).32 Kant’s essay was so important for him because, Foucault said, “this little text is located, as it were, at the crossroads of critical reflection and reflection on history. It is a reflection by Kant on the contemporary status of his own enterprise. No doubt, it is not the first time that a philosopher has given his reasons for undertaking 31 Habermas, Jürgen. “Taking Aim at the Heart of the Present: On Foucault’s Lecture on Kant’s What is Enlightenment?” Included in The New Conservativism: Cultural Criticism and the Historians’ Debate. Translated by Shierry Weber Nicholsen. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1989. pg. 176. In an earlier work, Habermas had accused Foucault of being a “young conservative” who had attempted to “justify a wholly irreconcilable anti-modernism.” See Habermas, Jürgen. “Modernity versus Postmodernity.” Translated by Seyla Benhabib. New German Critique, No. 22 (Winter, 1981). pg. 13. Habermas seems to retract this charge in Taking Aim at the Heart of the Present, attributing the change in Foucault’s attitude towards modernity to his discovery of a “different” Kant. Habermas assumes that this “new” Kant is “different” than “the epistemologist who thrust open the door to the age of anthropological thought and the human sciences with his analyses of finitude” that Foucault had described in The Order of Things. Edward McGushin has argued, against Habermas, that Foucault’s later reflections on What is Enlightenment are, in fact, consistent with his discussion of the Kant’s critical philosophy in The Order of Thing...
Archaeological means the science or study of the material remains of past life or activities and the physical site, location, or context in which they are found, as delineated in the Department of Interior's Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979.

Related to Archaeological

Archaeological site means a geographic locality in Washington, including but not limited to, submerged and submersible lands and the bed of the sea within the state's jurisdiction, that contains archaeological objects.
Wildlife habitat means areas which, because of climate, soils, vegetation, relationship to water, location and other physical properties, have been identified as of critical importance to maintenance of wildlife species.
Species means any group of animals classified as a species or subspecies as commonly accepted by the scientific community.
Vegetation means trees, willows, shrubs, weeds, grasses, reeds, rushes or other vegetable growths;
Soil means all unconsolidated mineral and organic material of any origin.
Artifacts means any products generated, developed or used by a certificated teacher. Artifacts should not be created specifically for the evaluation system. Additionally, tools or forms used in the evaluation process may be considered as artifacts.
Habitat means the place or type of site where an organism or population naturally occurs.
Flooding means a volume of water that is too great to be confined within the banks or walls of the stream, water body or conveyance system and that overflows onto adjacent lands, thereby causing or threatening damage.
Biological agent shall mean any pathogenic (disease producing) micro-organism(s) and/or biologically produced toxin(s) (including genetically modified organisms and chemically synthesized toxins) which cause illness and/or death in humans, animals or plants.
Geologically hazardous areas means areas that because of their susceptibility to erosion, sliding, earthquake, or other geological events, are not suited to the siting of commercial, residential, or industrial development consistent with public health or safety concerns.
Vulnerability means a weakness of an asset or mitigation that can be exploited by one or more threats.
Wetlands or “wetland” means an area that is inundated or saturated by surface water or ground water at a frequency and duration sufficient to support, and that under normal circumstances does support, a prevalence of vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions, commonly known as hydrophytic vegetation.
Groundwater means all water, which is below the surface of the ground in the saturation zone and in direct contact with the ground or subsoil.
Hazardous Wastes means all waste materials subject to regulation under CERCLA, RCRA or applicable state law, and any other applicable Federal and state laws now in force or hereafter enacted relating to hazardous waste disposal.
Erosion means the detachment and movement of soil or rock fragments by water, wind, ice, or gravity.
Endangered species means wildlife designated by the commission as seriously threatened with extinction.
Pathological waste means waste material consisting of only human or animal remains, anatomical parts, and/or tissue, the bags/containers used to collect and transport the waste material, and animal bedding (if applicable).
Wetland means those areas that are inundated or saturated by surface or groundwater at a frequency and duration sufficient to support, and that under normal circumstances do support, a prevalence of vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions. Wetlands generally include swamps, marshes, bogs, and similar areas.
Hazardous chemical means a chemical for which there is statistically significant evidence based on at least one study conducted in accordance with established scientific principles that acute or chronic health effects may occur in exposed employees. The term "health hazard" includes chemicals which are carcinogens, toxic or highly toxic agents, reproductive toxins, irritants, corrosives, sensitizers, hepatotoxins, nephrotoxins, neurotoxins, agents which act on the hematopoietic systems, and agents which damage the lungs, skin, eyes, or mucous membranes.
Wildlife means all species of the animal kingdom whose members exist in Washington in a wild state. The term "wildlife" includes, but is not limited to, any mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian, fish, or invertebrate, at any stage of development. The term "wildlife" does not include feral domestic mammals or the family Muridae of the order Rodentia (old world rats and mice).
Hazardous waste means the substances regulated as such pursuant to any Environmental Law.
Dangerous animal means any animal that:
animals means all vertebrate and invertebrate animals such as but not limited to bovine cattle, horses and other equines, hogs, goats, dogs, cats, rabbits, sheep, chickens, ducks, geese, turkeys, pigeons, and other fowl or wild animals, reptiles, fish, bees or birds that have been tamed, domesticated or captivated.
Wild animals means those species of the class Mammalia whose members exist in Washington in a wild state and the species Rana catesbeiana (bullfrog). The term "wild animal" does not include feral domestic mammals or old world rats and mice of the family Muridae of the order Rodentia.
Wild animal means any mammal, bird, fish, or other creature of a wild nature endowed with sensation and the power of voluntary motion.
Household hazardous waste means any waste material derived from households (including single and multiple residences, hotels, motels, bunkhouses, ranger stations, crew quarters, campgrounds, picnic grounds, and day-use recreation areas) which, except for the fact that it is derived from a household, would otherwise be classified as a hazardous waste in accordance with9VAC20-60.