Reason to believe definition

Reason to believe means information from which a reasonable person would believe that the person may have been involved in an accident.
Reason to believe as used in this policy means evidence which, if presented to individuals of similar background and training, would cause those individuals to believe that a child was abused or neglected.
Reason to believe simply means that, based on what you have seen or information you have received, you believe a child has been or is likely to be at risk.

Examples of Reason to believe in a sentence

  • Reason to believe that impediment exists should result in referrals that may address the impediment(s) to mediation.

  • Reason to believe that an impediment may exist should result in referrals that may address the impediment(s) to mediation.

  • Reason to believe a conflict of interest exists under the City’s Conflict of Interest policy or applicable federal regulations.

  • Reason to believe that one or both parties’ health or safety would be endangered by mediation.

  • Reason to believe that student will be returning to school prior to November 1st.


More Definitions of Reason to believe

Reason to believe means a belief by the collection site person that a particular individual intends to alter or has altered or substituted a specimen. Reason to believe includes, for example:
Reason to believe means a situation where a person has sufficient cause to believe that something is true or false, but not otherwise;
Reason to believe means that the evidence available to that person, if presented to other individuals of similar background and training, would make those individuals think that the consumer has been abused or neglected.
Reason to believe simply means that, based on what was seen or information received, a person believes a child has been or is likely to be at risk. The reporter need not be certain. It is the child welfare worker’s job to determine whether abuse or neglect has occurred or is likely to occur.
Reason to believe means that based on observation or information received, the person believes that a child has been or is likely to be at risk. Proof is not required. The Child Welfare Worker may investigate and makes determination whether abuse or neglect has occurred or is like to occur. (Further discussion and examples may be found in the BC Handbook for Action on Child Abuse and Neglect for Service Providers.) A school district employee who has reason to believe that a child “needs protection” must make a report to a Child Welfare Worker. If the employee has a concern but is not sure whether the concern amounts to a reason to believe that the child needs protection, the employee should consult with school district officials and/or a Child Welfare Worker about whether the indicators observed are cause for concern or amount to reason to believe that the child needs protection.School Officials may support employees in consultations or reports, but should not hinder any employee from consulting with a Child Welfare Worker about a concern. Reporting to the Police Abused or neglected children may be victims of offences under the Criminal Code of Canada such as physical or sexual assault; sexual exploitation; failure to provide the necessities of life; or criminal negligence causing bodily harm. Where a child is in imminent danger, school officials should notify the police immediately. Not every incident that might constitute an offence (e.g., a minor physical assault) warrants police involvement. Where a report is made to a Child Welfare Worker, normally the Child Welfare Worker will decide whether there is reason to believe that there has been a criminal offence committed that warrants police involvement and if so, the matter is reported by the Child Welfare Worker to the police in order that they can exercise their law enforcement duties. If school employees have any questions as to whether conduct should be reported to the police, they should consult with school officials and/or a Child Welfare Worker. Reporting to School District Officials Employees who make reports to a Child Welfare Worker should inform theschool principal.
Reason to believe means a reason to believe that a particular individual may alter or substitute the urine specimen.
Reason to believe means that based on observation or information received, the person believes that a child has been or is likely to be at risk. Proof is not required. The child welfare worker may investigate and