Breakpoint chlorination definition

Breakpoint chlorination means the addition of a sufficient amount of chlorine to water to destroy the combined chlorine present.
Breakpoint chlorination means the conversion of inorganic chloramine compounds to nitrogen gas by reaction with free available chlorine. The point at which the drop occurs is referred to as the “breakpoint”. The amount of free chlorine that must be added to the water to achieve breakpoint chlorination is approximately ten times the amount of combined chlorine in the water.
Breakpoint chlorination means the addition of chlorine to water until the chlorine demand has been satisfied and further additions result in a residual that is directly proportional to the amount added.

Examples of Breakpoint chlorination in a sentence

  • Booster pump system" means a device used to provide hydraulic support for certain types of equipment such as pool cleaning systems, gas chlorinators, and solar systems.(j) "Breakpoint chlorination" means the addition of a sufficient amount of chlorine to water to destroy the combined chlorine present.(k) "Broadcast" means a method of putting granular or powdered chemicals into a pool by spreading them widely over the surface of the water.(l) "Building official".

  • Breakpoint chlorination - A disinfection method in which chlorine dose is sufficient to oxidise rapidly all the ammonia nitrogen in the water, and to leave a suitable free chlorine residual to protect against cross-infection in the pool.

  • Drinking water treatment-removal of impurities, disinfection, Break-point chlorination.

  • Breakpoint chlorination and membrane-based technologies have been less commonly used, unlike some studies based on the alteration of substrate C/N ratios to ensure optimal microbial growth (Karthikeyan & Visvanathan, 2012; Kayhanian, 1999; Siles et al., 2010).

  • Breakpoint chlorination involves the dosing of wastewater with high concentrations of chlorine to convert ammonium-nitrogen to other forms.


More Definitions of Breakpoint chlorination

Breakpoint chlorination means establishing a hygienic environment in the pool by raising the free available chlorine level to 10 times the combined chlorine level to achieve the destruction of chloramines.
Breakpoint chlorination means the conversion of inorganic chloramine compounds to nitrogen gas by reaction with Free Available Chlorine. When chlorine is added to water containing ammonia (from urine, sweat, or the environment, for example), it initially reacts with the ammonia to form monochloramine. If more chlorine is added, monochloramine is converted into dichloramine, which decomposes into nitrogen gas, hydrochloric acid and chlorine. The apparent residual chlorine decreases since it is partially reduced to hydrochloric acid. The point at which the drop occurs is referred to as the “breakpoint”. The amount of free chlorine that must be added to the water to achieve breakpoint chlorination is approximately ten times the amount of combined chlorine in the water. As additional chlorine is added, all inorganic combined chlorine compounds disappear, resulting in a decrease in eye irritation potential and “chlorine odors.”
Breakpoint chlorination means the conversion of inorganic chloramine compounds to nitrogen gas by reaction with Free Available Chlorine. When chlorine is added to water
Breakpoint chlorination means the point in a rising chlorine residual at which the concentration of free or available chlorine becomes great enough to completely oxidize all organic matter and ammonia compounds (chloramines) in a pool.
Breakpoint chlorination means the addition of a sufficient amount of chlorine to water to destroy the combined chlorine present. Breakpoint chlorination is approximated by the addition of chlorine sufficient to obtain total chlorine residual ten (10) times the original combined chlorine residual.
Breakpoint chlorination means the conversion of inorganic chloramine compounds to nitrogen gas. When CHLORINE is added to water containing ammonia (from urine, sweat, or the environment, for example), it reacts with the ammonia to form chloramines. If more CHLORINE is added, the total residual CHLORINE continues to rise until the concentration reaches a point that forces the reaction with ammonia to go to rapid completion. In this reaction, the inorganic chloramines are converted to DICHLORAMINE, then to nitrogen trichloride, and then to nitrogen gas. Compounds of nitrogen and CHLORINE are released into the water, and the apparent residual CHLORINE decreases. The point at which the drop occurs is referred to as the “breakpoint”. The amount of free CHLORINE that must be added to the water to achieve breakpoint chlorination is approximately ten times the amount of combined CHLORINE in the water. As additional CHLORINE is added, all inorganic combined CHLORINE compounds disappear, resulting in a decrease in eye irritation potential and “CHLORINE odors.”
Breakpoint chlorination means addition of chlorine to water until the chlorine demand has been satisfied. At this point, further addition of chlorine will result in a free residual chlorine that is