The Report Sample Clauses

The Report. The Report will be prepared by the Surveyor who carried out the Property inspection and will describe various aspects of the Property as defined by the headings of the Single Survey report with the comments being general and unbiased. The report on the location, style and condition of the Property will be concise and will be restricted to matters that could have a materialaffect upon value and will omit items that, in the Surveyor’s opinion, are not significant. If certain minor matters are mentioned, it should not be interpreted that the Property is free of any other minor defects.Throughout the Report the following repair categories will be used to give an overall opinion of the state of repair and condition of the Property:
The Report. The Surveyors will not provide an amended Report on the Property, except to correct factual inaccuracies. The Report will identify the nature and source of information relied upon in its preparation.The Surveyor shall provide a Market Value of the Property, unless the condition of the Property is such that it would be inappropriate to do so. A final decision on whether a loan will be granted rests with the Lender who may impose retentions in line with their lending criteria. The date of condition and value of the property will be the date of inspection.Prior to the 1st of December 2008, Purchasers have normally obtained their own report from their chosen Surveyor. By contrast, a Report is instructed by the Seller and made available to all potential Purchasers in expectation that the successful Purchaser will have relied upon it. The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors rules require disclosure of any potential conflict of interest when acting for the Seller and the Purchaser in the same transaction. The Report may give rise to a conflict of interest and if this is of concern to any party they are advised to seek their own independent advice.The Report and any expressions or assessments in it are not intended as advice to the Seller or Purchaser or any other person in relation to an asking price or any other sales or marketing decisions.The Report is based solely on the Property and is not to be relied upon in any manner whatsoever when considering the valuation or condition of any other property.If certain minor matters are mentioned in the Report it should not be assumed that the Property is free of other minor defects. Neither the whole nor any part of the Report may be published in any way, reproduced or distributed by any party other than the Seller, prospective Purchasers and the Purchaser and their respective professional advisors without the prior written consent of the Surveyors.
The Report. 3.1 Terminology around this issue is important. The term ‘food poverty’ is used here to reflect wording in previous reports to Council, however, more fitting terms that reflect our ambition rather than what we intend to eradicate are being explored and will be used in future reports. The term’ household food insecurity’ will also be used in this report to describe a situation where people do not havemeans to reliably meet their needs for food of sufficient quantity, quality or variety in socially acceptable ways. 3.2 Household food insecurity is a growing national issue and B&NES residents living in areas of high deprivation are increasingly affected. Existing vulnerability has been greatly exacerbated through the past nine months of the coronavirus pandemic. Household food insecurity is a complex issue with three core and closely linked drivers at the household level: • Insufficient household income to reliably and consistently afford a healthy and nutritious diet for all household membersPoor networks of informal social support• Adverse life experiences (job loss, bereavement, relationship breakdown, social exclusion, trauma, poor health etc) 3.3 These key drivers have been exacerbated by a decade of austerity measures that have led to cuts to universal and targeted services, stagnated wage growth and an increase in insecure employment models including zero-hours contracts. Much of the B&NES economy is dependent on the more precarious sectors of food, hospitality and service, and this is coupled with a higher than average cost of living in the area, mainly due to higher housing costs, which can all have a detrimental impact on household income. 3.4 The Food Poverty work in B&NES is led by the public health team and coordinated through by a Health Improvement Officer. The post was recruited as a 0.6 FTE, fixed term contract until July 2021. Recently funding has been secured through the St John’s Foundation to extend the post until July 2024. 3.5 The B&NES Food Poverty Steering Group (see Appendix 1 for Terms of Reference) has met five times since its first meeting on 25th March 2020 at the start of the first coronavirus lockdown period. The main focus has been on understanding the challenges emerging for residents in relation to immediate food needs and provision of welfare support. The Steering Group has provided a network for members to share information, co-ordinate activity and both offer and request support. Membership currently stands at over 60 ...
The Report. The surveyors will not provide an amended Single Survey Report on the Property, except to correct factual inaccuracies. The Single Survey Report will identify the nature and source of information relied upon in its preparation.
The Report. 4.1 In the lead up to Christmas 2016, the Council’s Town Centre Management team once again produced a ‘Choose the High Street’ Christmas Voucher Booklet. The scheme provides local retailers with the opportunity to take part in a co-ordinated marketing campaign. This year’s Christmas Voucher Booklet contained 112 offers across the five managed town centres which was an increase of 7 on the previous year. The aims of the scheme are to provide businesses with an opportunity to capture consumer spend during the Christmas period and also to market the diverse retail offer contained in the town centres. 4.2 The booklet was designed by the Council’s Graphic Design team. In addition, to the offers also included was a brief description of each town centre, a map of the County Borough showing the location of the five managed towns and adverts promoting the work in the community of different Council departments. These adverts raised awareness of the role of the Community Safety Wardens and the support offered to residents who are over 50 as part of Welsh Government’s ‘Aging Well in Walesinitiative. They also included details of the Visitor Attractions, the Go2 My Town website and the Christmas Events programme. 4.3 The scheme was officially launched on 31st October at Risca Library where local school children from Risca and Ty Syn Primary Schools joined the Cabinet Member Cllr. James and Father Christmas. 4.4 Marketing Platforms 4.4.1 To support the campaign a number of different marketing platforms were utilised including: • Bus adverts;• Advertorial pages in the Caerphilly Observer;• Social media engagement on the Council and Go2 My Town Facebook / Twitter feeds;• Articles in the Council’s Newsline publication, which is delivered to every household in the County Borough;• Dedicated web page on the CCBC corporate website including a PDF version of the booklet;• PDF version of the booklet and promotional page on the Go2 My Town website. 4.5 Production and Distribution 4.5.1 A total of 30,000 Voucher Booklets were produced, with distribution being carried out by the Council’s Community Safety Wardens. The following locations gave out voucher booklets: • Caerphilly: Library / Customer First Centre / Visitor Centre / Wetherspoons - The Malcolm Uphill;• Blackwood: Library / Customer First Centre / Blackwood MinersInstitute / Tidal Stores / Maxime Cinema, Chinkles;• Bargoed: Library / Customer First Centre, Poundworld;• Risca: Library / Customer First Centre & Tesco;•...
The Report. 4.1 The Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013 require accidents which arise as a result of, or in connection with, work to be categorised as follows and reported to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE): • Fatal accidents • ‘Specified injury’ (formerly referred to as a ‘major injury’), including a fracture, other than to fingers, thumbs and toes; amputation of an arm, hand, finger, thumb, leg, foot or toe; permanent loss or reduction of sight; crush injuries leading to internal organ damage; serious burns (covering more than 10% of the body, or damaging the eyes, respiratory system or other vital organs); scalpings (separation of skin from the head) which require hospital treatment; unconsciousness caused by head injury or asphyxia; and any other injury arising from working in an enclosed space, which leads to hypothermia, heat- induced illness or requires resuscitation or admittance to hospital for more than 24 hours. • Accidents which cause an employee to be away from work or unable to perform their normal work duties for more than seven consecutive days (not counting the day of the accident). • Work-related accidents involving members of the public or people who are not at work (including pupils) if the injured person is taken from the scene of the accident to hospital for treatment to that injury. 4.2 The termnon reportableaccident or incident, refers to any accident or incident that is not included in point 4.1 and therefore is not reportable to the Health and Safety Executive. Most of these accidents result in minor injuries. Accidents in this classification are reported to the Health and Safety Division only if they affect: • Employees while they are at work. • Pupils, clients and members of the public who are injured as a result of work activity while they are on Council premises or using the facilities. • Any persons who are injured as a result of any work activity carried out by or on behalf of the Authority. 4.3 Appendix 1 provides details on all of the accidents for the Authority that have been reported to the Health and Safety Division between January to March 2015. These are categorised by accident type and by type of incident, e.g. non-reportable, over seven days’ lost time or restricted duties, and ‘specified’ (formerly referred to as a ‘major’) injury. 4.4 Appendix 2 details the Reportable Accidents Per Directorate January to March 2015 and details those accidents that occurred to members of the pub...
The Report. 5.1 Local authority prosecution - boundary wall collapse5.1.1 Basildon Borough Council has been sentenced after a brick boundary wall it part-owned collapsed and seriously injured a six-year-old girl.Basildon Crown Court heard how a wall spanning the back of two houses collapsed onto the girl during a family barbecue. She was placed in an induced coma after sustaining serious and life-threatening injuries. She was in intensive care for 7 days and in hospital for 10 days in total. She has made a good recovery but still suffers some physical and emotional problems.An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found the Council failed to take any action after receiving concerns about the wall’s condition from private tenants, two years prior to the incident. Wider concerns about the poor condition of brick walls in the vicinity, including council-owned walls, were not passed to building control or the Council’s inspections teams. The Council failed to implement a system of intelligence-led inspection, maintenance and repair, to adequately identify and remedy the risks of collapses to boundary walls, both owned solely by the Council, or jointly with private residents.Basildon Borough Council pleaded guilty to breaching Section 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 and fined of £133,333 and ordered to pay costs of £21,419.55. 5.2 Local authority prosecution – worker crushed by refuse vehicle 5.2.1 Pendle Borough Council has been fined after a worker’s leg was crushed by a refuse collection vehicle. Burnley Magistrates’ Court heard how, on 30 October 2015, a labourer with Pendle Borough Council, was struck by a large refuse vehicle whilst at work in Nelson, Lancashire. At the time of the incident, three refuse vehicles were in the immediate vicinity. The employee suffered severe crush injuries which resulted in surgery to remove his lower right leg. An investigation by the HSE found the Council had neglected to properly identify the well- known hazards posed by refuse collection operations. Consequently, the council had failed to devise safe working methods and provide the necessary information and training to their workers to prevent harm arising. Pendle Borough Council pleaded guilty to breaching Sections 2(1) and 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc act 1974. Total fines of £40,000 were imposed with costs of £14,000. 5.3 HSE fee for intervention rate increase 5.3.1 The HSE has increased its fee for intervention (FFI) hourly rate...
The Report. 4.1 As of the last week of March Caerphilly County Borough Council currently commissions 9000.5 hours per week of external domiciliary care. This is a snap shot figure as the amount of care provided and commissioned varies on a daily basis 4.2 In the same week the in house homecare service, Home Assistance Reablement Team (HART) provided 2922.25 hours per week of support. not including travel time. Emergency Care at Home and Reablement provided a further 722.30 hours of support excluding travel time.4.3 Current arrangements for commissioning are by way of a Framework Agreement with 9 providers that was established via a formal tender process undertaken in 2012. The length of the contract was for 4 years with an option to extend for a further 2 years. The option to extend the contract was implemented and the current arrangement came to an end at the end of November 2017. All current providers agreed to an extension of the existing arrangements while this work is undertaken. 4.4 In addition to the framework, there are 2 providers that were given direct awards having failed to get on to the framework at the point of tender. This was agreed as these were evidenced to provide a good quality of care and it was identified we needed to have sufficient capacity to meet identified needs of vulnerable people. 4.5 In 2016 following a lengthy period of having limited capacity within the existing framework and the direct awards to respond to new work, especially in relation to the discharge of people from hospital. The decision was made to establish a supplementary framework to respond to the increase need. As a result 3 new providers were introduced to CCBC. Despite this action capacity issues still remain. 4.6 A CSSIW review identified in 2015/16 that the domiciliary care market is very fragile with a serious lack of capacity – this lack of capacity comes at a high cost for individuals, families and public authorities with increasing pressure on delayed transfers of care from hospitals. The review focussed on 2 factors that were felt to be driving some of the behaviours in the system, namely – ❖ ‘General workforce shortages, resulting in ‘call cramming’ and ‘call clipping’ at certain times of the day in some areas’.❖ ‘Overzealous application of procurement and finance rules which can result in a tendency to drive down prices in the short term, punitive contract terms and a need to account for every penny spent’. 4.7 In March 2017, Mihomecare terminated their contract ...
The Report. The Surveyors will not provide an amended Report on the Property, except to correct factual inaccuracies. The Report will identify the nature and source of information relied upon in its preparation. The Surveyor shall provide a Market Value of the Property, unless the condition of the Property is such that it would be inappropriate to do so. A final decision on whether a loan will be granted rests with the Lender who may impose retentions in line with their lending criteria. The date of condition and value of the property will be the date of inspection.