OPS definition

OPS means the current Ontario Provincial Standards published by the Ontario Standards organization.
OPS means the "GLA Open Project System", being the GLA’s on-line investment management system from time to time or any successor system and/or any other system which performs any of the same functions and which GLA notifies to the Contractor from time to time.
OPS means the Office of Procurement Services within the Finance and Administration Cabinet.

Examples of OPS in a sentence

  • An untimely protest is one received by the DAS OPS after the time periods set in paragraph 2 above.

  • Any other information the protester believes to be essential to the determination of the factual and legal questions at issue in the written request.2. A timely protest will be considered by DAS, on behalf of the agency, if it is received by the DAS, Office of Procurement Services (OPS) within the following periods:a.

  • Any other information the protester believes to be essential to the determination of the factual and legal questions at issue in the written request.2. A timely protest will be considered by DAS, on behalf of the agency, if it is received by the DAS Office of Procurement Services (OPS) within the following periods:a.

  • The tendering process shall be conducted in accordance with the OPS Procurement Directive.

  • No price change shall be effective without prior written consent from DAS, OPS.


More Definitions of OPS

OPS means the overseas payment service offered to Prudential Shareholders on the UK Register for the payment of dividends by electronic means in the currency of the Prudential Shareholder’s choice for a small fee.
OPS means “Office of Pipeline Safety,” as defined herein.
OPS means the "GLA Open Project System", being the GLA's online investment management system from time to time or any successor system.
OPS means other products or services provided by Royal Bank or any other Person, other than the Services;
OPS part of DevSecOps means that security information and event management (SIEM) and security orchestration, automation, and response (SOAR) capabilities are baked-in throughout each of the eight DevSecOps SDLC phases. Integration into these tools must be considered at every phase in order to properly practice DevSecOps. This requirement substantially differentiates DevSecOps from legacy ways of development software where integration was done after the fact using a “bolt-on” mentality.