Total resource cost test definition

Total resource cost test or "TRC test" means a standard that is met if, for an investment in energy efficiency or demand-response measures, the benefit-cost ratio is greater than one. The benefit-cost ratio is the ratio of the net present value of the total benefits of the program to the net present value of the total costs as calculated over the lifetime of the measures. A total resource cost test compares the sum of avoided electric utility costs, representing the benefits that accrue to the system and the participant in the delivery of those efficiency measures, as well as other quantifiable societal benefits, including avoided natural gas utility costs, to the sum of all incremental costs of end-use measures that are implemented due to the program (including both utility and participant contributions), plus costs to administer, deliver, and evaluate each demand-side program, to quantify the net savings obtained by substituting the demand-side program for supply resources. In calculating avoided costs of power and energy that an electric utility would otherwise have had to acquire, reasonable estimates shall be included of financial costs likely to be imposed by future regulations and legislation on emissions of greenhouse gases.
Total resource cost test or "TRC test" means a standard
Total resource cost test or ‘TRC test’ means a standard that is met if, for an investment in energy efficiency or demand-response measures, the benefit-cost ratio is greater than one. The benefit-cost ratio is the ratio of the net present value of the total benefits of the program to the net present value of the total costs as calculated over the lifetime of the measures. A total resource cost test compares the sum of avoided electric utility costs, representing the benefits that accrue to the system and the participant in the delivery of those efficiency measures, to the sum of all

Examples of Total resource cost test in a sentence

  • Section 8-103 and Section 16-111.5B TRC Test: "Total resource cost test" or "TRC test" means a standard that is met if, for an investment in energy efficiency or demand- response measures, the benefit-cost ratio is greater than one.


More Definitions of Total resource cost test

Total resource cost test means a cost effectiveness test that measures whether an energy efficiency program or demand response program is cost effective based on the total cost and benefit of the program, including both the participants' and the utility's costs.
Total resource cost test means a cost-effectiveness test that eliminates the distinction between a participant and nonparticipant by analyzing whether a resource is cost effective based on the total cost and benefit of a DSM program, independent of the precise allocation to a shareholder, ratepayer, and participant.
Total resource cost test or "TRC test" means a standard that is met if, for an investment in energy efficiency or demand‐response measures, the benefit‐cost ratio is greater than one. The benefit‐cost ratio is the ratio
Total resource cost test or "TRC test" means a standard that is met if, for an investment in energy efficiency or demand-response measures, the benefit-cost ratio is greater than one. The benefit-cost ratio is the ratio of the net present value of the total benefits of the program to the net
Total resource cost test means a method of determining the overall economic efficiency of a demand management program from the perspective of society by measuring the net costs of the program based on its total costs, including, without limitation, the costs to both participants and the utility.
Total resource cost test means an ex-ante analysis to determine if, for an investment in energy efficiency or peak-demand reduction measure or program, on a life- cycle basis, the present value of the avoided supply costs for the periods of load reduction, valued at marginal cost, are greater than the present value of the monetary costs of the demand-side measure or program borne by both the electric utility and the participants, plus the increase in supply costs for any periods of increased load resulting directly from the measure or program adoption. Supply costs are those costs of supplying energy and/or capacity that are avoided by the investment, including generation, transmission, and distribution to customers. Demand-side measure or program costs include, but are not limited to, the costs for equipment, installation, operation and maintenance, removal of replaced equipment, and program administration, net of any residual benefits and avoided expenses such as the comparable costs for devices that would otherwise have been installed, and the salvage value of removed equipment.
Total resource cost test or "TRC test" means a standard that is met if, for an investment in energy efficiency or demand-response measures, the