Endanger definition

Endanger means to expose an individual to a situation where physical or mental injury to the individual may occur.
Endanger means to bring into danger or peril.
Endanger means to bring into danger or peril of probable harm or loss; imperil or threaten to danger; to create a dangerous situation.21

Examples of Endanger in a sentence

  • Endanger the life or physical safety of law enforcement personnel.

  • Endanger the life or safety of law enforcement officers or agents or their families, relatives, children, parents, or those who furnish information to law enforcement departments or agencies.

  • Endanger the Trust or the tax-exempt status of retirement plans administered by CalSTRS and the deferred treatment of income tax on employer contributions to the plans and related earnings.

  • All materials that are buoyant, flammable, explosive, or in times of flooding, could be injurious to human, animal, or plant life, and not listed in Section 5.04, Development Which May Endanger Human Life, shall be stored at or above the Regulatory Flood Elevation or floodproofed to the maximum extent possible.

  • Endanger the organization's public image or credibility, particularly in ways that would hinder its accomplishment of mission.


More Definitions of Endanger

Endanger means that there is a threat of extinction. In other words, the population of a species has decreased, or is decreasing, to the level at which its survival is at risk, or the habitat of a species has degraded or decreased or is degrading or decreasing.
Endanger means that the subscriber or enrollee fears that disclosure of his or her medical information could subject the subscriber or enrollee to harassment or abuse.
Endanger means ‘to expose to loss or injury; to jeopardize.’” In re M.C., 917 S.W.2d 268, 269 (Tex. 1996) (quoting Texas Dep’t of Human Servs. v. Boyd, 727 S.W.2d 531, 533 (Tex. 1987)). “Although ‘endanger’ means more than a threat of metaphysical injury or the possible ill effects of a less-than-ideal family environment, it is not necessary that the conduct be directed at the child or that the child actually suffers injury.” Id. Evidence of endangerment may include conduct that does not occur in the presence of the child and may include parental conduct occurring “both before and after the child has been removed by the Department.” Pruitt v. Texas Dep’t of Family & Protective Servs., No. 03-10-00089-CV, 2010 Tex. App. LEXIS 10272, at *13–14 (Tex. App.—Austin Dec. 23, 2010, no pet.) (mem. op.). The relevant inquiry under subsection (E) is whether evidence exists that the endangerment of the child’s well-being was “the direct result of Appellant’s conduct, including acts, omissions, or failures to act.” In re M.E.-M.N., 342 S.W.3d 254, 262 (Tex. App.—Fort Worth 2011, pet. denied) (citation omitted). “Additionally, termination under subsection (E) must be based on more than a single act or omission; the statute requires a voluntary, deliberate, and conscious course of conduct by the parent.” Id.
Endanger means more than a threat of metaphysical injury or the possible ill effects of a less-than-ideal family environment, but it is not necessary that the conduct be directed at the child or that the child actually suffers injury. Rather, "endanger" means to expose to loss or injury; to jeopardize.
Endanger means to expose an individual to a situation where physical or mental injury to the individual may occur. 33.32.“Enrolled child” means a child:
Endanger means to expose an individual to a situation where physical injury or mental injury to the individual may occur. 42.41.“Enrolled” means placed by a parent and accepted by a licensee for child care services.