Constructive knowledge definition

Constructive knowledge means knowledge or information that a protestor would have if the protestor had exercised reasonable care or diligence, regardless of whether the protestor actually has the knowledge or information. Such knowledge includes knowledge of:
Constructive knowledge means knowledge obtainable (even if not actually obtained), assuming the exercise of either (a) reasonable care or diligence, or (b) diligent inquiry and due diligence in accordance with (i) above, as applicable; (iii) “employees” of the Sponsor shall include any employees of the Sponsor and of any Affiliates who have provided services to the Sponsor in connection with the transaction contemplated by this Agreement; (iv) “best knowledge” shall mean the best knowledge (which shall include actual knowledge and constructive knowledge in accordance with (ii) above) of the employees of the Sponsor and attorneys for the Sponsor working on the transaction contemplated by this Agreement; (v) “actual knowledge” shall mean the actual knowledge (excluding constructive knowledge) of the employees of the Sponsor and attorneys for the Sponsor working on the transaction contemplated by this Agreement; and (vi) “Sponsor Affiliates” means the Guarantor, and any other entity controlled by, or under common control with, any of them.
Constructive knowledge means knowledge that is imputed to family or household

Examples of Constructive knowledge in a sentence

  • Constructive knowledge, on the other hand, will be found where the initial transferee became aware of circumstances that should have led it to inquire further into the circumstances of the transaction, but failed to make the inquiry.

  • Constructive knowledge shall be established by the day to day operation of the business.

  • Constructive knowledge is whatever notice is enough to excite attention and put the injured party on guard and call for inquiry.

  • Constructive knowledge To add to the problems in Delaney, the wording of the crime exemption was not challenged as being incompatible with the MVID.

  • Constructive knowledge is demonstrated by evidence of facts or circumstances showing that the possessor of the premises should have known of a defective or dangerous condition through the exercise of reasonable care.18 Idaho appellate courts have not extensively addressed the issue of the evidence necessary to demonstrate constructive knowledge on the part of a possessor of land, although a few specific examples will be discussed below.


More Definitions of Constructive knowledge

Constructive knowledge of a Party means, with respect to any fact, circumstance, event or other matter in question, (a) the actual knowledge of such fact, circumstance, event or other matter, or (b) the knowledge of such fact, circumstance, event or other matter that would have been ascertained after reasonable inquiry, consistent with such Person’s title and responsibilities, in either case, by any of the following individuals with respect to such Party or the Party’s employees who directly report to such individuals: Russell Howard, Larry Briscoe, Elliot Goldstein, John Borkholder, Grant Yonehiro, Sridhar Viswanathan, Erik Karrer and Norm Kruse.
Constructive knowledge as here applied shall mean, that by exercise of reasonable care, one would have known the fact or suspect that the drug product he or she has sold or in possession of is counterfeit, such as but not limited to the knowledge that the drug was not covered by any sales invoice or evidence of delivery of purchase from a BFAD license drug establishment.
Constructive knowledge means, with respect to any Person, knowledge of a particular fact, circumstance or set of facts or circumstances which could be obtained by exercising the degree of care which a person of ordinary prudence would exercise in the same or similar circumstances;
Constructive knowledge means knowledge that is
Constructive knowledge means that a supervisor or manager of the employer, by exercise of reasonable diligence, should have had actual knowledge that the injured worker was impaired on the date of the workplace accident.
Constructive knowledge means knowledge that an individual with the position and job responsibilities with respect to Parent or its Subsidiaries or the Company or its Subsidiaries, as applicable, using reasonable care or diligence should have; provided, however, that, with respect to the Company and its Subsidiaries, the knowledge that an individual using reasonable care or diligence should have shall be assessed in the context of the services performed for the Company and its Subsidiaries by (i) Transocean Offshore Deepwater Drilling Inc. (“TODDI”) and its employees and Representatives pursuant to that certain Master Services Agreement dated August 5, 2014, among the Company, its Subsidiaries and TODDI, and (ii) Holdings and its employees and Representatives pursuant to that certain Master Services Agreement dated August 5, 2014, among the Company, its Subsidiaries and Holdings and, if applicable, in their roles as an officer or director of the Company or its Subsidiaries. In determining the constructive knowledge of Kathleen McAllister, Raoul Dias, Daniel Reudelhuber and Steve McFadin, such individual shall not be deemed to have constructive knowledge of any fact or circumstance or other matter with respect to which incorrect information was given, or any omission of relevant information was made, by an employee of Parent, Holdings, their Affiliates or their Representatives, provided that such individual reasonably relied upon any such incorrect information or omission.
Constructive knowledge means, with respect to a Person, the knowledge that such Person should reasonably be deemed to have on the applicable date based on the books, records, files or other documents in the possession of such Person on or prior to such date.