Unfair prejudice definition

Unfair prejudice means an undue tendency to suggest decision on an improper basis, commonly, though not necessarily, an emotional one. “Unfair prejudice” may also arise from evidence or testimony that may be persuasive because of its strongly misleading or confusing nature.
Unfair prejudice means a tendency to suggest decision on an improper basis or to divert the jury’s attention away from its duty of weighing the evidence impartially.
Unfair prejudice within its context means an undue tendency to suggest decision on an improper basis, commonly, though not necessarily, an emotional one.

Examples of Unfair prejudice in a sentence

  • Unfair prejudice “is not merely damaging evidence, even severely damaging evidence; rather, unfair prejudice is evidence that persuades by illegitimate means, giving one party an unfair advantage.” State v.

  • Unfair prejudice petitions are notoriously capable of giving rise to lengthy, complex and expensive litigation.

  • Unfair prejudice exists when there is a tendency that the evidence will be given undue or preemptive weight by the jury, or when it would be inequitable to allow the use of the evidence.

  • It is argued that national the specificity of intellectual capital might not be revealed by models created to explain busi- ness resources.

  • Unfair prejudice "speaks to the capacity of some concededly relevant evidence to lure the factfinder into declaring guilt on a ground different from proof specific to the offense charged." Old Chief v.


More Definitions of Unfair prejudice

Unfair prejudice within its context means an undue tendency to suggest [a]
Unfair prejudice. * * * means an undue tendency to suggest a decision on an improp- er basis * * *. [It] describes a situation in which the preferences of the trier of fact are affected by reasons essentially unrelated to the persuasive power of the evidence to es- tablish a fact of consequence.’’ State v. Lyons, 324 Or. 256, 280, 924 P.2d 802 (1996).
Unfair prejudice means ‘a tendency to suggest decision on an improper basis or to divert the jury’s attention away from its duty of weighing the evidence impartially.’” Castellani v. Scranton Times, L.P., 124 A.3d 1229, 1245 (Pa. 2015), citing Pa.R.E. 403 (comment). Furthermore,
Unfair prejudice within its context means an undue tendency to suggest decision on an improper basis, commonly, though not necessarily, an emotional one . . . .
Unfair prejudice means a tendency to suggest decision on an improper basis or to divert the jury’s attention away from its duty of weighing the evidence impartially.” Id. at Comment. “The function of the trial court is to balance the alleged prejudicial effect of the evidence against its probative value and it is not for an appellate court to usurp that function.” Parr v. Ford
Unfair prejudice means the undue tendency to suggest a decision based on improper considerations; it “does not mean the damage to
Unfair prejudice. ... means an undue tendency to suggest decision on an improper basis ....” Steger v. General Electric Co., 318 F.3d 1066, 1079 (11th Cir. 2003)(internal quotes omitted). Since Block has not established any impropriety in ABS’s reliance of the November 3 and December 17 repetitions of the multiplier proposal, their usage cannot be “unfairfor purposes of Rule 403.15