Similarity Sample Clauses

Similarity. LDCA phenomena share the general property that the interacting segments bear a high level of ‘similarity’. We view similarity as determined by shared features, and our typology reveals that in terms of features, [sonorant], [continuant] and place features are the most important in identifying classes of similar segments. Segments within these classes are differentiated by one or more minor features such as [lateral] or [voice]. Table 1 summarizes our similarity findings with respect to LDCA, and lists one example language for each type: INSERT TABLE 1 HERE Homorganicity is an independent requirement that may be imposed on laryngeal and nasal agreement. We also note that laryngeal specifications do not usually impact Coronal or Dorsal agreement. For example, sibilant agreement may obtain regardless of the [cg] or [voice] features of the interacting consonants, as seen with the Aari example in 10. Similarly, dental and retroflex agreement operates between stops regardless of voicing. The major Place nodes, Labial, Dorsal, Coronal and Pharyngeal do not show long-distance agreement. We discuss possible reasons for their exclusion in §7. The notion of ‘similarity’ in MSCs has previously been noted by Xxxxxxxxxxxxx (1993), xxx xxx Xxxxxx (1994), Xxxx (1996), Xxxxxx (1996), Xxxxxx et al. (2004) and XxxXxxxxxx (1997), although most of these works focus primarily on dissimilatory constraints (but Xxxxxx et al. 2004 discuss possible extensions to harmony systems). The metric for computing similarity proposed by Xxxxxx et al. (2004) relies on feature classes, groups of segments characterized by a set of distinctive features. Similarity is obtained by calculating the shared feature classes of two segments in a given language inventory and dividing it by the number of shared feature classes plus non- shared feature classes. The similarity metric is based on individual language inventories, but the method uses universal features and natural classes. Therefore, even though a particular pair of consonants may not have the exact same similarity rating in different languages, its position as more or less similar with respect to another consonant pair is maintained. Although it was developed for other phenomena, this method of computing similarity is successful in establishing relevant hierarchies between sets of consonants found in consonant agreement, and we adopt it here. For example, homorganic consonants are computed as more similar than heterorganic, and nasal stops ar...
Similarity. LDCA phenomena share the general property that the interacting segments bear a high level of ‘similarity’. We view similarity as determined by shared features, and our typology reveals that in terms of features, [sonorant], [continuant] and place features are the most important in identifying classes of similar segments. Segments within these classes are differentiated by one or more minor features such as [lateral] or [voice]. The following table summarizes our similarity findings with respect to LDCA, and lists one example language for each type:
Similarity. The similarity requirement recognizes the ephemeral harm that dilu- tion seeks to protect,108 and is absolutely critical to establishing a claim for dilution. Dilution by blurring occurs only when people see the same xxxx used on more than one product. (Notwithstanding the Nabisco court’s statements to the contrary). If the senior and junior xxxx are not identified as the same or substantially the same, there simply can be no blurring. (See Xxxx DataLexus vs. Lexis and the “Xxx Xxxxxxtest, See also Ringling v. B.E. Windows (difference in one word)) Had the Ringling court taken this factor seriously, Ringling would not have prevailed, and there would have been no need to apply such a restrictive test.109 108 See Comment, Will-O’-The-Wisp, supra note 91. 109 See Ringling Bros.-Xxxxxx & Xxxxxx Combined Shows, Inc. v. B.E. Windows Corp., 937 F.Supp. 204, 209, 211 (S.D.N.Y.1996) (Finding “show” is the most important word in senior’s “Greatest Show On Earth Xxxx,” and is not similar enough to “Bar” for “The Greatest Bar On Earth” xxxx to infringe senior’s xxxx).

Related to Similarity

  • Size The relative importance we attach is “high”. We are the principal to every order you place with us and therefore we are the only execution venue.

  • Geometric visibility The visibility of the illuminating surface, including its visibility in areas which do not appear to be illuminated in the direction of observation considered, shall be ensured within a divergent space defined by generating lines based on the perimeter of the illuminating surface and forming an angle of not less than 5° with the axis of reference of the headlamp.

  • Ethnicity 3. Gender

  • Grievability Denial of a petition for reinstatement is grievable. The grievance may not be based on information other than that shared with the Employer at the time of the petition for reinstatement.

  • Outcome Measurable change that occurs as a result of a program’s overall performance in implementing its planned Activities.

  • Complexity Intermediate professional level role. Provides production support on multiple platforms. Works on multiple projects as a team member and may lead projects of moderate complexity. May coach more junior technical staff. JOB FAMILY: TELECOMMUNICATIONS‌ Job Title: Manager, Telecommunications Operations Job#: 3000 General Characteristics Manages the operations, daily planning, engineering, design, and resource allocation for the enterprise’s telecommunications functions. Ensures customer satisfaction through quality standards and measures by evaluating the performance of telecommunications networks and related interfaces. Responsible for strategic telecommunications planning and works with senior IT leadership to coordinate telecommunication plans with those of the business. Develops and implements standards, procedures, and processes for the telecommunications group. Plans and manages the support of new technologies, performance and reliability. Defines and negotiates service level agreements. Oversees and coordinates the daily activities of the operations center. Performs a coordination role with enterprise management, vendors and customers.

  • Orientation The Employer shall provide planned and paid Orientation Programs of such content and duration as it deems appropriate taking into consideration the needs of the Employer and the Nurses involved. Such Nurses will not be considered part of core staffing during their Orientation Program nor will they be provided with primary assignments.

  • Impact direct impact on people does not necessarily require direct contact, for example, environmental health, trading standards and similar officers may have a direct impact on people, through the implementation or enforcement of regulations, without necessarily having direct contact with those who benefit.

  • Special Risks or Circumstances County reserves the right to modify these requirements, including limits, based on the nature of the risk, prior experience, insurer, coverage, or other special circumstances.

  • Visibility 1. Unless the Council of Europe requests or agrees otherwise, the Grantee shall take all necessary measures to publicise the fact that the Action has been funded within the framework of a Joint Project between the European Union and the Council of Europe. Information given to the press and to the beneficiaries of the Action, all related publicity material, official notices, reports and publications, shall acknowledge that the Action was carried out with a grant from a Joint Project between the European Union and the Council of Europe and shall display in an appropriate way the Joint Projects’ visual identity (for instructions on use of the Joint Projects’ visual identity, see Appendix IV).