NIGERIA Sample Clauses

NIGERIA. There are no country specific provisions. NORWAY There are no country specific provisions.
NIGERIA. There are no country-specific provisions. NORWAY There are no country-specific provisions. PERU
NIGERIA. There are no country-specific provisions. NORWAY There are no country-specific provisions. OMAN Notifications Securities Law Notice The Plan does not constitute the marketing or offering of securities in Oman and consequently has not been registered or approved by the Central Bank of Oman, the Omani Ministry of Commerce and Industry, the Omani Capital Market Authority or any other authority in the Sultanate of Oman. Offerings under the Plan are being made only to eligible employees of the Employer, the Company, its Subsidiaries and its Affiliates. PAKISTAN
NIGERIA. Nigeria is the United States’ largest trading partner in sub-Saharan Africa, due to the high level of petroleum imports from Nigeria. Total two-way trade was valued at $30.8 billion in 2006, a 19 percent increase over 2005. The leading U.S. exports to Nigeria were machinery, wheat and motor vehicles. U.S. imports from Nigeria were oil and rubber products. Nigerian exports to the United States under AGOA, including its GSP provisions, were valued at $23.9 billion during the first eleven months of 2006, a 19 percent increase over the same period in 2005, due to an increase in oil exports. The United States was the largest foreign investor in Nigeria in 2005. In June 2006, the United States met with Nigeria under the existing Trade and Investment Framework Agreement (TIFA) to advance the ongoing work program and to discuss improvements in Nigerian trade policies and market access. Among other topics discussed were investment issues and cooperation to develop a strategy for Nigeria to diversify its export base, especially in the area of manufactured goods. Under the auspices of the TIFA, the United States and Nigeria pledged to work together on critical issues such as the WTO Doha Development Agenda, intellectual property rights, and trade capacity building. In 2006, Nigeria continued to implement reforms aimed at improving its trade and investment environment, including the removal of certain textile items from its list of import bans. However, the United States continues to be concerned about Nigeria’s use of protective import bans on certain products, including sorghum, millet, wheat flour, rice, meats, and bulk vegetable oil.
NIGERIA. On October 1, 1960 the territories formerly comprising the British Colony and Protectorate of Nigeria attained fully responsible status within the British Commonwealth under the name of the Federation of Nigeria (Federation of Nigeria Independence Act, 1960). By an ex- change of notes, dated October 1, 1960, be- tween the High Commissioner for the United Kingdom in the Federation of Nigeria and the Prime Minister of the Federation of Nigeria, Nigeria agreed to assume, from October 1, 1960, all obligations and responsibilities of the United Kingdom which arise from any valid international instrument insofar as such instru- ments may be held to have application to or in respect of Nigeria are from October 1, 1960 enjoyed by the Federation of Nigeria.
NIGERIA. The Federal Republic of Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa, is also the leading African oil producer. About one-third of the landscape across which the Cross River Gorillas are spread lies within Nigeria, and all of this area is within Cross River State. Here, gorillas occur in three areas, the Afi Mountain Wildlife Sanctuary, the Mbe Mountains, and the Okwangwo Division of Cross River National Park. The total remaining population in the country is estimated at around 75-110 individuals. Existing Legislation:
NIGERIA. Nigeria is a country rich in oil mineral resources with proven reserves of 35 billion barrels of oil which ranks it as the world’s sixth largest oil producing nation.150 The discovery of oil in commercial quantities at Oloibiri in 1956 quickly garnered Nigeria the moniker of a country that is both blessed and cursed with crude oil.151Oil production in Nigeria is mainly done through joint ventures between the government and a number of multinational oil companies.152 Several decades since the exploitation of oil reserves began has seen the waters and landscape destroyed beyond beneficial use which is largely due to the degraded state of the environment caused by oil producing countries in the region.153 The TNCs which are responsible for the oil production continuously act in a manner that is without due regard for environmental consequences.154 This is evidenced by the fact that between 1976 and 1997 there were 5,334 reported cases of crude oil spills that released about 2.8 million barrels of oil into the land and coastal waters.155 It has been posited that in other oil producing 149 Okuthe I, ‘Environmental and Social Challenges of Oil and Gas Exploration in Kenya’, 169.150 Eweje G, ‘Environmental Costs and Responsibilities Resulting from Oil Exploration in Developing Countries: The Case of the Niger Delta of Nigeria’, 34.151 Hassan MA, ‘The right to a clean and healthy environment as a tool for seeking redress for damages caused byenvironmental pollution in Nigeria, with particular reference to the Niger Delta region: A case study of Jonah Gbemre vs. SPDC (2005) AHLR 151 (NgHC 2005)’ 3 Journal of the Mooting Society University of Lagos, 2018, 7.152 Eweje G, ‘Environmental Costs and Responsibilities Resulting from Oil Exploration in Developing Countries: The Case of the Niger Delta of Nigeria’, 34.153 Hassan MA, ‘The right to a clean and healthy environment as a tool for seeking redress for damages caused byenvironmental pollution in Nigeria, with particular reference to the Niger Delta region: A case study of Jonah Gbemre vs. SPDC (2005) AHLR 151 (NgHC 2005)’, 7.154 Hassan MA, ‘The right to a clean and healthy environment as a tool for seeking redress for damages caused byenvironmental pollution in Nigeria, with particular reference to the Niger Delta region: A case study of Jonah Gbemre vs. SPDC (2005) AHLR 151 (NgHC 2005)’, 7.155 Ugochukwu C and Ertel J, ‘Negative impacts of oil exploration on biodiversity management in the Niger Dearea of Nigeria’ 26...
NIGERIA. Christian Aid:The overall goal of this project is: "to reduce the suffering of conflict-affected populations in Borno State". This goal will be achieved by providing emergency WASH and food assistance to conflict-affected populations in Borno State: food security; and water, sanitation & hygiene (WASH). These two sectors are among the priority needs identified in UNOCHA's Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP). Food SecurityFor the food security component, more attention will be devoted to providing emergency food assistance through unconditional transfers (UCTs) to vulnerable households. The target is to reach 500 HH (6 persons per HH, i.e. 3000 beneficiaries) with at least 4 rounds of transfers throughout the duration of this project. Essentially, 1200 males and 1800 females to benefit from the UCTs. Water, Sanitation & Hygiene (WASH)The WASH intervention will focus on providing integrated water supply, sanitation and hygiene promotion service which will contribute to better health among the affected community. Thus, the program will increase access to water supply through the construction of new hand pumps and the rehabilitation of existing water infrastructures. CA/NCA will also work on increasing the provision of sanitation facilities the through construction and rehabilitation of gender- disaggregated sanitation facilities as well as by means of implementing different environmental sanitation components in order to make safe living environment for the community. The WASH response will also focus on increasing the awareness of the community to enable them to take actions to prevent themselves and their family from communicable disease that are caused by lack of hygiene and sanitation. It is essential to note that results of needs assessment and degree of accessibility will determine the LGAs and communities where this intervention will occur. More information about the expected results and activities for this project are contained in the logical framework instrument attached as an annex to this proposal. Norwegian Church Aid: ProtectionThe proposed response will build upon the groundwork that NCA has established in building local capacity to respond to and prevent GBV. NCA focuses on working with local partner organizations who enjoy long-standing relationships with the communities and therefore enjoy unparalleled access and credibility among the affected populations. NCA's added value includes experience in working with local faith-based actors who command...